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I'm having this slight issue with my program. In Visual Studio 2012 it runs fine, but if I compile it with G++ (yes, for reasons above me, I have to use it to compile), the error signals 11(SIGSEGV) or 6(SIGABRT) get triggered depending on the input. This is a programming excercise and I have another program (on an online server) which tests my program with 10 different inputs. As I said, the program compiles and works well while using Visual Studio 2012.

About the program: It finds the shortest path from starting point (x,y) to a number of exits (the amount of exits are irrelevant and differ. There could be only 1 exit or there could be 200). The input goes as follows:

7 12          // maze height and width
##########.#  //
#..........#  //
#.###.######  //
#..X#.#.....  // the maze blueprint
#.###.#.####  //
#..........#  //
############  //

And my program:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

typedef struct _laby_t {
    int h, w;
    char **pohja; // 'pohja' is finnish and means layout
} laby_t;

typedef std::vector<int> monovector;
typedef std::vector< std::vector<int> > bivector;

laby_t *laby_allocate (int r, int c)
{
    laby_t *laby;
    int i;

    laby = new laby_t[sizeof (laby_t)];
    laby->pohja = new char *[r];
    for (i = 0; i < r; i++)
    {
        laby->pohja[i] = new char[c];
    }
    laby->h = r;
    laby->w = c;

    return laby;
}

int wander(int y, int x, laby_t *&_laby, int goals)
{
    laby_t *laby = _laby;
    int found = 0, depth = 0, min_path = 1000000;
    bool b = 0;
    bivector openList;
    monovector start; start.push_back(y); start.push_back(x);
    bivector closedList;

    openList.push_back(start);

    while(found < goals)
    {

        y = openList.back()[0]; x = openList.back()[1];
        monovector r; r.push_back(y); r.push_back(x); closedList.push_back(r);
        openList.pop_back();
        if(laby->pohja[y][x] != '*') laby->pohja[y][x] = '-';
        depth++;

        if(y == 0 || y+1 == laby->h || x == 0 || x+1 == laby->w) {
            found++;
            if(depth < min_path) min_path = depth;
            if(found >= goals) {
                std::cout << min_path << std::endl;
                break;
            }
            laby->pohja[y][x] = '-';

            goto back_track;
        }
        else
        {
            b = 0;
            if(laby->pohja[y+1][x  ] == '.') { monovector r; r.push_back(y+1); r.push_back(x); openList.push_back(r); b=1; }
            if(laby->pohja[y  ][x+1] == '.') { monovector r; r.push_back(y); r.push_back(x+1); openList.push_back(r); b=1; }
            if(laby->pohja[y-1][x  ] == '.') { monovector r; r.push_back(y-1); r.push_back(x); openList.push_back(r); b=1; }
            if(laby->pohja[y  ][x-1] == '.') { monovector r; r.push_back(y); r.push_back(x-1); openList.push_back(r); b=1; }
            if(!b)
            {
back_track:     while(closedList.size() > 0)
                {
                    //std::cout << closedList.size() << std::endl;
                    int c_y = closedList.back()[0]; int c_x = closedList.back()[1];
                    int o_y = openList.back()[0];   int o_x = openList.back()[1];

                    laby->pohja[y][x] = '*';

                    y = c_y; x = c_x;

                    laby->pohja[y][x] = '*';

                    if( (c_y+1 == o_y && c_x   == o_x) ||
                        (c_y   == o_y && c_x+1 == o_x) ||
                        (c_y-1 == o_y && c_x   == o_x) ||
                        (c_y   == o_y && c_x-1 == o_x) )
                    {
                        laby->pohja[y][x] = '-';
                        y = o_y; x = o_x;
                        closedList.pop_back();
                        depth--;
                        break;
                    }
                    else {
                        closedList.pop_back();
                        depth--;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return min_path;
}

int main()
{
    int h, w, goals = 0;
    std::cin >> h >> w;

    laby_t *laby;
    laby = laby_allocate(h, w);

    for(int i = 0; i < laby->h; i++)
        std::cin >> laby->pohja[i];

    for(int i = 1; i < laby->h-1; i++) {
        if(laby->pohja[i][0] == '.') goals++;
        if(laby->pohja[i][laby->w-1] == '.') goals++;
    }

    for(int i = 1; i < laby->w-1; i++) {
        if(laby->pohja[0][i] == '.') goals++;
        if(laby->pohja[laby->h-1][i] == '.') goals++;
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < laby->h; i++)
        for(int j = 0; j < laby->w; j++) {
            if(laby->pohja[i][j] == 'X') {
                wander(i, j, laby, goals);
                goto _exit;
            }
        }

_exit:

    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}

I have done my homework concerning the errorsignals, and in case you guys don't know about it: http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/C++Signals.html

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Mat, Thomas, Neolisk, Stefan Gehrig, Harald Scheirich Dec 29 '12 at 23:09

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Your first step should be to compile with debugging information and debug the code so you at least know which line is causing you the problem. –  Neil Dec 29 '12 at 17:21

2 Answers 2

This line overflows your memory allocation. If the user enters w characters, then (w+1) characters will be needed to hold the null-terminated string.

    std::cin >> laby->pohja[i];

This line is also allocating an array of many laby_t objects, though you seem to want only one. Perhaps you confused C++ new with C malloc.

laby = new laby_t[sizeof (laby_t)];

You can replace it with this.

laby = new laby_t;

This also seems to be a remnant of C. It's not a bug, but it unnecessarily pollutes the current namespace with reduntant symbols.

typedef struct _laby_t { ... } laby_t;

You can replace it with this.

struct laby_t { ... };
share|improve this answer
    
I am a bit unfamiliar with structs so as long as my debugger doesn't go boom, I wouldn't notice :D allocation too: I had to copy a snippet of code which used malloc, but since it didn't do with g++ I had to give it up and try the other way. Thank you! Very helpful. I'll see into my code as fast as I get back home. –  Olavi Mustanoja Dec 29 '12 at 18:26

The code compiles cleanly on a Mac OS X 10.7.5 with G++ 4.7.1, which is good:

g++ -g -Wall -Wextra laby.cpp -o laby 

Unfortunately, when the result is run under valgrind, it produces:

==15030== Invalid write of size 1
==15030==    at 0x306BE: std::basic_istream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator>><char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_istream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, char*) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==15030==    by 0x10000117D: main (laby.cpp:113)
==15030==  Address 0x10001632c is 0 bytes after a block of size 12 alloc'd
==15030==    at 0xB823: malloc (vg_replace_malloc.c:266)
==15030==    by 0x5768D: operator new(unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==15030==    by 0x576DA: operator new[](unsigned long) (in /usr/lib/libstdc++.6.0.9.dylib)
==15030==    by 0x1000008C0: laby_allocate(int, int) (laby.cpp:21)
==15030==    by 0x100001146: main (laby.cpp:110)

So, there is a problem with the memory allocation in the laby_allocate() function. Or several...

laby_t *laby_allocate (int r, int c)
{
    laby_t *laby;
    int i;

    laby = new laby_t[sizeof (laby_t)];

This line allocates an array of laby_t; it allocates as many elements in the array as there are bytes in a laby_t. This is not what you needed.

    laby = new laby_t;

Continuing:

    laby->pohja = new char *[r];
    for (i = 0; i < r; i++)
    {
        laby->pohja[i] = new char[c];
    }

This does not allocate enough space for the null at the end of the data...which is why the 'write' is 1 byte. Change the c to c+1 and valgrind gives a clean bill of health.

    laby->h = r;
    laby->w = c;

    return laby;
}

The answer given is 15; I'm not convinced that's correct.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah! Yes, allocation is not yet my strongest point. I'll see into my code as I get back home. –  Olavi Mustanoja Dec 29 '12 at 18:28

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