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Would you take a look over this?:

This is my client:

try {
        Socket socket = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 3000);
        OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();

        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
        oos.writeObject(mp3data);
        oos.close();

        byte[] bytes = baos.toByteArray();
        out.write(bytes);
        } 
        catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

This is my server:

int port = 3000;
        try {
        ServerSocket clientConnect = new ServerSocket(port);
        System.out.println("SimpleServer running on port" + port);
        Socket clientSock = clientConnect.accept();
        InputStream is = clientSock.getInputStream();


    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    int read = is.read(buffer);

    ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(is);
    MP3[] songs = (MP3[])ois.readObject();  

    clientSock.close();

    // HTML erzeugen
    Website site = new Website("index2.html",songs);

    } catch (Exception e) {
    System.out.println (e);
    }

It ain't work. I don't get any exceptions but the Website-Constructor isn't called.

share|improve this question
    
Did you already debug? –  burna Dec 29 '12 at 16:59
1  
You should probably out.flush() after out.write() on the client side. Also, on the server side, you define a measly-sized 1024 bytes buffer, I doubt it will be able to receive what you wish it to receive, unless I am mistaken... –  fge Dec 29 '12 at 16:59
1  
codereview.stackexchange.com is better place to ask question of like this –  Walery Strauch Dec 29 '12 at 17:03
    
Instead of writing to a ByteArrayOutputStream write directly to your output. The way you do it probably works but it's unnecessary and can lead to memory problems. And remove int read = is.read(buffer); since that will read and discard the beginning of your object. –  zapl Dec 29 '12 at 17:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You assume that the whole byte array is read in just one call to read(), and has a length of exactly 1024 bytes. That's not the case (unless you're extremely lucky). Moreover, your ObjectInputStream is wrapping the InputStream from which you have already read the bytes (or some of the bytes) constituting the message. And also, the bytes written by the sender are not flushed.

Don't ignore the result of the call to is.read(): It tells you how many bytes have actually been read. And until it's not -1, you should continue to read, in a loop.

Read the Java tutorial on byte streams.

That said, you're making things difficult. Why don't you write the object directly to the socket output stream, and read the object directly from the socket input stream at the other side?

share|improve this answer
    
I will fix it tomorrow. Thanks for your answer, maybe then I have another question. –  Alexander Haase Dec 29 '12 at 17:13
    
Ok, I've done so but I think somewhere is another syntax error. –  Alexander Haase Dec 31 '12 at 12:33
int port = 3000;
        try {
        ServerSocket clientConnect = new ServerSocket(port);
        System.out.println("SimpleServer running on port" + port);
        Socket clientSock = clientConnect.accept();
        InputStream is = clientSock.getInputStream();

        byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];

        for (int i = 0; i < buffer.length; i++) {
          int b = is.read();
          if (b  ==-1) break;
          buffer[i] = (byte) b;
        }

        ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(new ByteArrayInputStream(buffer));
        MP3[] songs = (MP3[])ois.readObject();;
        ois.close();

        clientSock.close();
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