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Assume that we have Linux + Apache + PHP installed with all default settings. I have some PHP website that uses some large thirdparty PHP library, let's say 1 Mb of PHP sources. This library is used very rarely, let's say for POST requests only. There is a reason why I can't move this library usage into separate PHP file. So, I have to include this library for each HTTP request, but use it very rarely. Should I concern about time spend for PHP parsing in that case? Let me explain. I could do this:

<?php
require_once('heavy_library.php');
// do regular stuff
if(we need heavy library)
{
    heavy_library_function();
}
?>

I assume that this solution is bad because in this case heavy_library.php is parsed for each HTTP request. I can move it into the if statement:

<?php
// do regular stuff
if(we need heavy library)
{
    require_once('heavy_library.php');
    heavy_library_function();
}
?>

Now as I understand it it's being parsed only in case when we need the library.

Now, get back to the question. Default settings for Apache and PHP. Should I concern about this issue? Should I move require_once into the place where it is really being used, or I can leave it as usual and Apache / PHP will do some kind of caching that will prevent parsing for each HTTP request?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, Apache will not do the caching. You should keep the require_once inside the if so it is only used when you need it.

If you do want caching of PHP, then look at something like eaccelerator.

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Ok, thanks for help! –  nyan-cat Dec 29 '12 at 18:35
    
You're welcome. Jack pointed out APC in his answer below, but I haven't used it. I have used eaccelerator in production and development for years and it's performed flawlessly. –  Andy Lester Dec 29 '12 at 18:41
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When you tell PHP to require() something, it will do it no matter what; the only thing that prevents parsing that file from scratch every time will be to use an opcode cache such as APC.

Conditionally loading the file would be preferred in this case. If you're worried about making life more complicated by having these conditions, perform a small benchmark.

You could also use autoloading to load files "on demand" automatically; see spl_autoload

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Thanks for spl_autoload, didn't know about it. –  nyan-cat Dec 29 '12 at 18:36
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