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I need to create an algorithm in C++ to simulate mutually repelling points on a sphere using a Monte Carlo method. So far what I have is this:

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <time.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
using namespace std;

int main()
{

  int a,f,g,n,m,i,j,k,r,s;
  double p,q,Energy,energy,y[101][4],x[101][4],Length,Distance;

 clock_t t1,t2;
  t1=clock();

  /*  set the number of points */
  n=12;

  /* check that there are no more than 100 points */
  if(n>100){
    cout << n << " is too many points for me :-( \n";
    exit(0);
  }

  /* reset the random number generator */
  srand((unsigned)time(0));  

  for (i=1;i<=n;i++){
    x[i][1]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;
    x[i][2]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;
    x[i][3]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;

    Length=sqrt(pow(x[i][1],2)+pow(x[i][2],2)+pow(x[i][3],2));

    for (k=1;k<=3;k++){
      x[i][k]=x[i][k]/Length;
    }
  }

  /* calculate the energy */
  Energy=0.0;

  for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
    for(j=i+1;j<=n;j++){
      Distance=sqrt(pow(x[i][1]-x[j][1],2)+pow(x[i][2]-x[j][2],2)
                    +pow(x[i][3]-x[j][3],2));

      Energy=Energy+1.0/Distance;
    }
  }

  /* Save Original Points */
  for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
    y[i][1]=x[i][1];
    y[i][2]=x[i][2];
    y[i][3]=x[i][3];
  }

  /* Loop for random points m times*/
  m=10;

  if (m>100){
    cout << "The m="<< m << " loop is inefficient...lessen m \n";
    exit(0);
  }

  a=1;

  while(a<m){

    /* assign random points */
    for (i=1;i<=n;i++){
      x[i][1]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;
      x[i][2]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;
      x[i][3]=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0;

      Length=sqrt(pow(x[i][1],2)+pow(x[i][2],2)+pow(x[i][3],2));

      for (k=1;k<=3;k++){
        x[i][k]=x[i][k]/Length;
      }
    }

    /* calculate the energy */
    energy=0.0;

    for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
      for(j=i+1;j<=n;j++){
        Distance=sqrt(pow(x[i][1]-x[j][1],2)+pow(x[i][2]-x[j][2],2)
                      +pow(x[i][3]-x[j][3],2));

        energy=energy+1.0/Distance;
      }
    }

    if(energy<Energy)
      for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
        for(j=1;j<=3;j++){
          Energy=energy;
          y[i][j]=x[i][j];
        }
      }
    else
      for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
        for(j=1;j<=3;j++){
          energy=Energy;
          x[i][j]=y[i][j];
        }
      }

    a=a+1;
  }

  /* Output the best random energy */
  cout << "Energy=" << Energy << "\n";

  m=10;
  a=1;

  while(a<m){
    /* Choose random point to move */
    g=(rand() % n)+1;

    /* Choose a p small to give q in a range -p <= q <= p */
    p=0.1;

    /* q is how much I am moving the random point by */
    q=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0*p;

    /* Move the point by q */
    for(j=1;j<=3;j++){
      x[g][j]=((x[g][j])+q);
    }

    /* Bring it back onto sphere */
    Length=sqrt(pow(x[g][1],2)+pow(x[g][2],2)+pow(x[g][3],2));

    for (k=1;k<=3;k++){
      x[g][k]=x[g][k]/Length;
    }

    /* Calculate the new energy */
    energy=0.0;

    for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
      for(j=i+1;j<=n;j++){
        Distance=sqrt(pow(x[i][1]-x[j][1],2)+pow(x[i][2]-x[j][2],2)
                         +pow(x[i][3]-x[j][3],2));

        energy=energy+1.0/Distance;
      }
    }

    /* Choose best energy and therefore best point */
    if (energy<Energy)
      Energy=energy,x[g][1]=y[g][1],x[g][2]=y[g][2],x[g][3]=y[g][3];
    else
      energy=Energy,y[g][1]=x[g][1],y[g][2]=x[g][2],y[g][3]=x[g][3];

    a=a+1;  

  }

   /* Output the best single shift energy */
  cout << "Energy=" << Energy << "\n";

  /* Set fail count to 0 */
  s=0;
  f=0;
  r=1;
  **p=0.1;**

  /* Maximum distance to move the random point */

  while (**p>0.00001**) {

    /* Number of loops to do */

    while (**r<3000**) {

      g=(rand() % n)+1;

      /* q is how much I am moving the random point by -p<=q<=p*/
      q=((rand()*1.0)/(1.0*RAND_MAX)-0.5)*2.0*p;

      /* Move the point by q */
      for(j=1;j<=3;j++){
        x[g][j]=((x[g][j])+q);
      }

      /* Bring it back onto sphere */
      Length=sqrt(pow(x[g][1],2)+pow(x[g][2],2)+pow(x[g][3],2));

      for (k=1;k<=3;k++){
        x[g][k]=x[g][k]/Length;
      }

      /* Calculate the new energy */
      energy=0.0;

      for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
        for(j=i+1;j<=n;j++){
          Distance=sqrt(pow(y[i][1]-y[j][1],2)+pow(y[i][2]-y[j][2],2)
                        +pow(y[i][3]-y[j][3],2));
          energy=energy+1.0/Distance;
        }
      }

      /* Choose best energy and therefore best point */
      if (energy<Energy)
        Energy=energy,x[g][1]=y[g][1],x[g][2]=y[g][2],x[g][3]=y[g][3],s=s+1;
      else
        energy=Energy,y[g][1]=x[g][1],y[g][2]=x[g][2],y[g][3]=x[g][3],f=f+1;

      r=r+1;

    }

    **/* Calculate percentage fails */

    if ((100.0*(f/r))>50.0)
      p=(p-0.00001);
    else
      p=p;**

    r=0;  

  }

  cout << "Overall Success Rate = " << ((s*1.0)/((s+f)*1.0))*100 << "%" << "\n";
  cout << "Energy=" << fixed << setprecision(10) << Energy << "\n";


  ofstream Bestpointssofar ("Bestpointssofar");
  for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
    Bestpointssofar << y[i][1] << " " <<   y[i][2] << " " << y[i][3] << "\n";
  }
  Bestpointssofar.close(); 

  t2=clock();
    float diff ((float)t2-(float)t1);
    float seconds = diff / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
    cout << fixed << setprecision(2) << "Run time: " << seconds << "(s)" << "\n";
    return 0;

}

Which I think is ok (note I am essentially trying to minimise the energy function), but I want to make it more accurate/make it run quicker. To do so I think I should change my value of p, the while loop conditions or how to alter p at the end of the code. (All of these are in *... * as I was trying to embolden them to make it clear to you where I mean. About 3/4 of the way through the code). I have been sitting for hours trying to alter these conditions but nothing is working. For n=12 (12 points on the sphere) my energy should come out at 49.16525306, but I can only get it between 50.5 and 54.0 really. I know this is relatively good, but I want it more accurate (even if it does take a while). I would alsolike the success rate to increase if possible (my overall success rate it absolutely appalling).

If anyone has any ideas, I would be very grateful for your help!

Thanks, A.

(Note: If you want to run the code you must take the double *'s out. There are four sections with double *'s surrounding them).

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, you seem like an intelligent scientist/mathematician who is trying to do some programming. I'm a physicist, and in my experience such people make some of the worst programmers; if at all possible, get some help from an experienced coder.

Second, look at this code (which is repeated, see First):

/* Move the point by q */
for(j=1;j<=3;j++){
  x[g][j]=((x[g][j])+q);
}

You are modifying all three coordinates by the same amount, which means you always move a point along the (1,1,1) ray. The results improve if you modify one coordinate at a time.

Third, in the final loop (which is the one that takes most of the time) your logic is a little screwy-- you modify x, but then calculate energy using y. The results are still pretty good, because you also have x and y transposed at the end of the loop, but correcting this improves the accuracy of the results.

Fourth, and this is a big one, when you perturb a point and then recalculate energy, you recalculate the contributions of all points; only one point has changed, which means that most of the point pairs have not changed and need not be recalculated. Instead, after you choose a point, you can calculate the contribution of that point with something like this:

double oldEnergy = 0.0;
  for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
      if(i!=g)
        {
          Distance=myDistance(x[i], x[g]);
          oldEnergy += 1.0/Distance;
        }
    }

Then calculate it again after the perturbation, and compare. This takes the calculation from O(n2) to O(n), which makes it a lot faster.

When I make these modifications (and make p converge 10 times faster, because I'm not very patient) my energy comes out at 49.1652530576.

share|improve this answer
    
@adrem7, in your (deleted) answer you say that you implemented these changes and got huge negative energies. My first point stands: whether you're trying to get this code to work or learn programming, the best way is to get help from an experienced coder. In this case your high-level mistake was to make many changes before testing any of them. Also you're calculating things that don't need to be calculated, and storing things that don't need to be stored. (I wrote a Point class, which simplified the code a lot.) Specifically, you set energy to zero, then subtract from it. – Beta Jan 5 '13 at 11:22
    
@adrem7: CORRECTION the specific problem is not that you're subrtracting energy, it's that you still have x and y transposed at the end of the last big loop. – Beta Jan 6 '13 at 1:24

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