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Given this example:

struct Base {
    void func() { }
};


struct NoOtherBase : public Base {
};


struct OtherBase : public Base {
};

struct HasOtherBase : public OtherBase,
    public Base {
};


struct RandomBase : public Base {
};

struct RandomOtherBase : public RandomBase {
};

struct MultipleOtherBases : public RandomOtherBase,
    public Base {
};


template <class T>
void randomFunc(T* val) {
    /* Find out if T derives from any other class
     * based on Base at compile time.
     *
     * T = NoOtherBase -> false
     * T = HasOtherBase -> true
     * T = MultipleOtherBases -> true
     */
    constexpr bool hasAnotherBase = /* ... */;

    // Cast val to the found Base without runtime costs
    // and call the func() method.
    base->func();
}

The real is problem is that val already derives from Base. The challenge is to find other Base's. If T is HasOtherBase, func of OtherBase should be called. The compiler may throw random errors if T does not conform to the specification.

All features of C++ 11 can be used.

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closed as too localized by D.Shawley, Brian Roach, Chris, K-ballo, WhozCraig Jan 2 '13 at 1:14

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Well, what have you tried? What's the problem you're having with your approach? –  Brian Roach Dec 29 '12 at 18:31
    
Are you asking how to detect if an object has multiple inheritance? –  Drew Dormann Dec 29 '12 at 18:43
    
There is only one func() in all of this (Base::func()), so I can only guess wtf you're trying to do. Perhaps ask a question next time, as there are none in this post. –  WhozCraig Jan 2 '13 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

You can use dynamic_cast on a Base* to query for any derived classes:

void randomFunc(Base* b)
{
    OtherBase* hob = dynamic_cast<OtherBase*>(b);
    if (hob != nullptr)
        hob->func();

    NoOtherBase* nob = dynamic_cast<NoOtherBase*(b);
    if (nob != nullptr)
        nob->func();

    // ...
}

Of course that's pointless in this case, because there's only one "func" method. It would only make sense if some of the derived classes provide their own non-overriding versions of "func".

Another thing to consider is that, if you only want one version of the instance data of Base in a HasOtherBases or MultipleOtherBases object, you should derive from Base virtually, otherwise you'll run into the "diamond" problem. Without virtual inheritance, a MultipleOtherBases object will have the following structure at runtime:

enter image description here

If you change the code to:

struct Base {
    void func() { }
};

struct RandomBase : public virtual Base {
};

struct RandomOtherBase : public RandomBase {
};

struct MultipleOtherBases : public RandomOtherBase,
    public virtual Base {
};

Then it will have the following structure at runtime:

enter image description here

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Sorry, no virtual inheritance. It is important to keep different bases. –  hpohl Dec 29 '12 at 19:27

Since all classes in your example inherits Base, why not declare func as virtual?

struct Base {
    virtual void func() { }
};

struct OtherBase : public Base {
    void func() { //other stuff than in Base implementation }
};

Then just call func directly on your instance - val->func() - and the virtual property of func will take care of calling the most derived instance of func.

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