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Why do C++11-deleted functions participate in overload resolution?

I have two questions about the following C++11 code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct A {
  A()  { cout << "Default c-tor" << endl; }
  A(const A&)  { cout << "Copy c-tor" << endl; }
  A(A&&) = delete;
};

A f()
{
 A a;
 return a;
}

int main()
{
  A b = f();
  return 0;
}

I get the following compile errors with gcc and clang

gcc-4.7.2 (g++ --std=c++11 main.cpp):

main.cpp: In function ‘A f()’:
main.cpp:16:9: error: use of deleted function ‘A::A(A&&)’
main.cpp:8:2: error: declared here
main.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
main.cpp:21:10: error: use of deleted function ‘A::A(A&&)’
main.cpp:8:2: error: declared here

clang-3.0 (clang++ --std=c++11 main.cpp):

main.cpp:19:4: error: call to deleted constructor of 'A'
        A b = f();
          ^   ~~~
main.cpp:8:2: note: function has been explicitly marked deleted here
        A(A&&) = delete;
        ^
1 error generated.
  • Shouldn't the compiler use the copy constructor if the move constructor is explicitly deleted?
  • Does anyone know any use for "non-movable" types?

Thanks in advance.

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marked as duplicate by KillianDS, arrowdodger, Anoop Vaidya, Jefffrey, birryree Dec 30 '12 at 14:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
    
I'm wondering how would one return local object if A(A&&) is deleted. –  Nawaz Dec 29 '12 at 20:55
    
Actually that was my first question, shouldn't the compiler pick the copy constructor instead of the move constructor when the move constructor is explicitly deleted? (I understood the fact that deleted functions are considered in overload resolution) –  lucasmrod Dec 31 '12 at 15:28
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4 Answers

A(A&&) = delete;

Declaring and defining it as delete does still declare it, and does not make it completely non-existent. Rather, it's similar (but not identical) to declaring it empty and private. Like so:

private: 
  A(A&&){}

In fact, that was the trick sometimes used for other operators before = delete was available. Again, it exists in the sense of lookup, but calling it is not ever allowed and in C++ calling permissions are (in almost or all cases) done after everything else, such as overload resolution, name lookup.

The standard actually say (8.4.3)

A deleted function is implicitly inline.

And there's noting (that I find) saying that deleted functions should not participate in name lookup.

Also, from 8.4.3

A program that refers to a deleted function implicitly or explicitly, other than to declare it, is ill-formed. [ Note: This includes calling the function implicitly or explicitly and forming a pointer or pointer-to-member to the function. It applies even for references in expressions that are not potentially-evaluated.

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2  
@Nawaz: it's the same as the other two answers, since if it was truly "non-existent" then it wouldn't be considered in overload resolution. Ofc I wouldn't put it past the standard to introduce a technical definition of "existent" that contradicts the English meaning ;-) It's considered for some purposes but not others, although it has no function body so it's different from the defined private function above. –  Steve Jessop Dec 29 '12 at 20:25
    
@SteveJessop: By existent, Johan meant something that is not true. He tried to explain what he meant by showing the equivalent code : he defined it in the private section. –  Nawaz Dec 29 '12 at 20:28
1  
@Nawaz: shrug. Of course I don't know what's in Johan's mind but I'm pretty sure it's about the same as the other two answerers. –  Steve Jessop Dec 29 '12 at 20:30
    
@JohanLundberg: If deleted move-constructor means it is defined in the private means, the member functions of the class would be use it, which is not true. Hence that is not equivalent, and it doesn't mean it is private. If you left it undefined (only declaration in the private section), then that would be close to an equivalent code, but even then it is not exactly equivalent. –  Nawaz Dec 29 '12 at 20:32
1  
@Nawaz: sure, Johan never said it was equivalent. Tbh I'm not certain the the comparison with a private constructor is all that fruitful. It's a replacement for that technique but it works somewhat differently. But I agree that it's similar. –  Steve Jessop Dec 29 '12 at 20:43
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When you delete the move constructor, it doesn't remove it from the set of functions found by name lookup. Whenever your code would normally use the move constructor, you will get an error because, even though it was found, it has been deleted.

You have two moves in your code. The first is when you return a because when copy elision is possible and the object that would be copied is designated by an lvalue (a, here), it is treated as a move. The second is in the assignment A b = f(), because a f() is giving you a temporary that has not yet been bound to a reference.

If you want the copy constructor to be found rather than the deleted move constructor, you should just get rid of your deleted definition.

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This is a bit of a research task but I think declaring a move constructor states that the move constructor is to be considered. When it then gets deleted, it means that objects can be moved where they could be moved if there were a move constructor. If you want an object which isn't moved but copied, you'd just declare a copy constructor and you wouldn't mention the move constructor.

I haven't quite found the statement in the standard, yet, which explicitly states the above but there is Note in 12.8 [class.copy] paragraph 9 backing up part the above statement:

[ Note: When the move constructor is not implicitly declared or explicitly supplied, expressions that otherwise would have invoked the move constructor may instead invoke a copy constructor. —end note ]

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From C++ Working Draft 2012-11-02

8.4.3 Deleted definitions [dcl.fct.def.delete]
...
2 A program that refers to a deleted function implicitly or explicitly, other than to declare it, is ill-formed. [ Note: This includes calling the function implicitly or explicitly and forming a pointer or pointer-to-member to the function. It applies even for references in expressions that are not potentially-evaluated. If a function is overloaded, it is referenced only if the function is selected by overload resolution. — end note ]
...
4 A deleted function is implicitly inline.

Since the deleted move constructor is referenced, the program is ill-formed.

A "usage" for a non-movable type could be to prevent moving, and so prevent returning a local object. I haven't seen such a usage myself and I don't know whether this makes sense at all, but YMMV.

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