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Is this legal and/or good practice?

#define SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER  "7.0v1.1"

Want struct to always contain the version number.

typedef struct {
    char SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER; 
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
}mystruct;
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3  
Your code wont even compile! –  leiz Sep 11 '09 at 1:25
    
No warnings or errors? –  T.T.T. Sep 11 '09 at 1:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, that's not legal C.

The best way to do this is to create a function to generate new instances of your struct, and put the assignment in there:

#define SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER  "7.0v1.1"

typedef struct {
    char ver[sizeof SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER]; 
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
} mystruct;

mystruct *mystruct_new(int a, int b, int c)
{
    mystruct *ms = malloc(sizeof *ms);

    if (ms)
    {
        strcpy(ms->ver, SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER);
        ms->a = a;
        ms->b = b;
        ms->c = c;
    }

    return ms;
}
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OK thanks, my intention was to not assign it like the rest of the members .....somehow make it a constant in the structure, only changed at the macro... –  T.T.T. Sep 11 '09 at 1:35

Your string macro cannot be stored in a single char. You would need a char * or char[strlen(SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER)] buffer.

typedef struct _mystruct_t
{
    char version[10];
    int etc;
} mystruct_t;

mystruct_t ms;
strcpy(ms.version, SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER);
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No, it's not legal.

You could, however, do:

#define SW_VERSION "1.01"
typedef struct _foo {
 char ver[sizeof SW_VERSION];
 int a;
 int b;
 int c;
} foo;

foo bar={SW_VERSION,1,2,3};
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does not compile –  T.T.T. Sep 11 '09 at 1:30
    
you're right, fixed in edit. –  Coleman Sep 11 '09 at 1:31
    
As Adam points out below, the best way to do this is with a const char*, but I was just using the OP's code. So, if you're going to implement this, use const char*, not a #define. –  Coleman Sep 11 '09 at 13:39

Call me crazy, but as a developer who cut his teeth on embedded systems with far less than 640K of memory, I cringe every time I see a #define'd string. Without changing the default settings, the compiler may create a new instance of the string—and potentially allocate memory for that new instance—every time you use the macro.

An alternative, which allocates the string only once:

const char * const MyVersion = "7.0v1.1"  // Const ptr to const string

typedef struct _foo_t {
   const char *ver;
   int a;
   int b;
   int c;
} foo_t;

foo_t bar = { MyVersion, 1, 2, 3 };  // Copy the ptr, not the string
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Not legal as typed.

If you want to store a version number I recommend encoding it into a 32 bit int and filling it in at struct allocation time.

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Might I ask why you want to store this in a struct? Is it being sent across a network?

As far storage goes, compilers (or linkers, I'm not sure) can store the same string in one place in the data section if the same exact string is used more than once so using the macro isn't a bad thing. Personally I would do something like this:

const char *GetSoftwareVersion (void)
{
    return "Version 7.0.1";
}

If it is for a plugin-like DLL architecture, the function version is the most appopriate (such as the following:

const char *pluginVer = dll->GetSoftwareVersion(); // where GetSoftwareVersion is of type:
typedef const char *(* GetSoftwareVersionProc)(void);
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Here's one approach, which fixes everything at compile time:

/* -------------------------------------------------- */
/* Version.h */
#define SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER "7.0v1.1"

/* -------------------------------------------------- */
/* Global.h */
#define SoftwareVersionLENGTH   8
extern const char Global_SoftwareVersion[SoftwareVersionLENGTH];

/* -------------------------------------------------- */
/* Global.c */
#include "Global.h"
#include "Version.h"
const char Global_SoftwareVersion[SoftwareVersionLENGTH]
    = SOFTWARE_VERSION_NUMBER;

If the version number needs to be changed, only Version.h must be edited (assuming the version string doesn't get any longer).

The constant string Global_SoftwareVersion can then be referenced, consistently, in the code.

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