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I am a beginner to Python's pyserial. I am using a basic pyserial code to open a serial port and write the data to it.

import serial

ser = serial.Serial(0)  # open first serial port
print ser.portstr       # check which port was really used
ser.write("hello")      # write a string
ser.close() 

The code runs fine without any error on Python 2.7 on win 7. I have certain questions regarding this code.

1) My laptop does not have any "visual" serial port. It has 3 USB ports. How then can i have pyserial to communicate serially with devices. In other words where and how should i connect my micro controller to send and receive data serially.

2) How to view the sent data through pyserial(as mentioned in the code) virtually on system without interfacing any hardware to serial port.

any help will be highly appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

1) You need a USB->RS232 adapter. There are hundreds of devices, mostly based on a few chipsets. Ebay is your friend. Search for "USB RS232"

2) Try http://com0com.sourceforge.net/. It allows you to create a virtual loopback so that you can connect your Python app on one end and Putty on the other.

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Thanks Roland and Fuzzyfelt. Use of USB-rs232 converter would have eased my difficulties if the connection on micro controller would have been rs232(serial), but instead the connection to micro controller is also USB type. I would like to ask if it is possible to send the data to Micro controller by connecting it with one of the USB ports provided on the system and using pyserial. –  Ankur Dec 29 '12 at 21:42
    
In depends on what make and model the micro controller is. An Arduino, for example, has an USB->RS232/TTL chip built in for which you need a driver. –  Alastair McCormack Dec 30 '12 at 9:57

You can use serial.tools.list_ports.comports() to get a list of all existing ports. Since USB ports can have convertors to RS232, it could be that pyserial uses them by default.

To capture data sent to a serial port, you need a snooper. See this question.

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thanks for your reply. I used serial.tools.list_ports.comports() but then the python shows an error: Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Users\hp\Desktop\serisl.py", line 4, in <module> serial.tools.list_ports.comports() AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'tools'| –  Ankur Dec 29 '12 at 22:01
    
According to the documentation it was added in version 2.6. Are you using an earlier version? –  Roland Smith Dec 30 '12 at 0:31
    
Yes, I am using python 2.7. also i would like to ask: Use of USB-rs232 converter would have eased my difficulties if the connection on micro controller would have been rs232(serial), but instead the connection to micro controller is also USB type. I would like to ask if it is possible to send the data to Micro controller by connecting it with one of the USB ports provided on the system and using pyserial –  Ankur Dec 30 '12 at 4:58
    
Your exception is probably caused by a Namespace conflict between your app and the required library. You could change your import line to import serial as sl but it would easier for you to change the name of your file from serial.py to myserial.py –  Alastair McCormack Dec 30 '12 at 10:03
    
@Ankur: If both connectors are USB, you should use sourceforge.net/apps/trac/pyusb instead of pyserial. –  Roland Smith Dec 30 '12 at 12:08

In order to use serial port communication over USB, your microcontroller USB device must appear as a VCP (Virtual Com Port) in the device list. If it does, then can get the "COM" name from the device manager properties for that device, and you use that name (e.g. "COM23") in your python script.

Most people are lazy as just use the FTDI chip set on their microcontrollers. If so, you can download the FTDI VCP drivers from the FTDI website.

FTDI also supports a different USB device (same physical device, but different driver) that requires you to use custom code and a DLL but it is faster. The VCP is slower, but easier to use. They have drivers for both.

Before you use your python script, use a freeware terminal application to sanity check. PuTTY, RealTerm and TeraTerm are useful for this.

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I guess that your question is related to Python Test Scripts.

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