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My app plays background music using a MediaPlayer object. I store it in a .java file along with other global variables named - what else? - GlobalVariables, so to access it and the other variables, I use this call:

GlobalVariables.mPlayer

I want to have the MediaPlayer continue audio playback when switching between Activities in my app, but to pause when the app loses focus. To try to achieve this, I declared a boolean value called keepPlaying, also stored in GlobalVariables such that it's accessible to all Activities in the app. The idea is to have the Activity check the boolean flag every time onStop() is called, and if it finds that keepPlaying = false, pause playback, otherwise do nothing (keep it playing). I set the flag to true just before each startActivity() call, and set it to false in every onResume() call.

If I understand the Activity lifecycle correctly, when switching Activities, my app would first call OnStop() on the current one. So first I set keepPlaying to true, then onStop() is called. The method includes three lines:

super.onStop();
if(GlobalVariables.keepPlaying == false)
    GlobalVariables.mPlayer.pause();

So it should keep playback going whenever I make a startActivity call, but pause playback when I minimize the app. Then, in the next Activity's onResume() method, I set the flag to false:

if(GlobalVariables.keepPlaying == true){
    GlobalVariables.keepPlaying = false;
}else{
    GlobalVariables.mPlayer.start();

However, the app isn't behaving the way I want. It still pauses audio playback when switching Activities. I've tried creating getter and setter methods for the keepPlaying flag, but that hasn't fixed it, so I know it's not an access issue.

Can anyone think of any reason why this method isn't working or how I can fix it?

Thank you!

[EDIT] As requested, here is a more complete code sample. I don't have access to my own computer right now but this should be an exact re-creation. Assume all necessary imports.

public class GlobalVariables{

    public boolean keepPlaying;
    public MediaPlayer mPlayer;

    // Getter and setter methods, found to be unnecessary
    public void setKeepPlaying(boolean input){keepPlaying = input;}
    public boolean getKeepPlaying(){return keepPlaying;}
}

// First activity. Music plays after starting Activity, as expected.
public class FirstActivity extends Activity{

    @Override
    public void onCreate(...){
        super.onCreate(...);

        GlobalVariables.keepPlaying = false;
        GlobalVariables.mPlayer.create(this, R.raw.music);
    }

    @Override
    public void onStop(){
        super.onStop();

        // Check to see if we want to stop audio playback
        if(GlobalVariables.keepPlaying == false){
            GlobalVariables.mPlayer.pause();
    }

    @Override
    public void onResume(){
        super.onResume();

        // If audio is already playing, set keepPlaying to false. Otherwise, start audio playback.
        if(GlobalVariables.keepPlaying == true) //Thus audio is playing
            GlobalVariables.keepPlaying = false;
        else
            GlobalVariables.mPlayer.start();
    }

    public void launchNextActivity(){
        GlobalVariables.keepPlaying = true;
        startActivity(new Intent(FirstActivity.this, SecondActivity.class));
    }

}

Code for SecondActivity is the same as FirstActivity. When starting SecondActivity, the music abruptly stops. When hiding the app and resuming it, the music begins playing again.
share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you use a service to do this? You can set the player to automatically stop if the service is not bound to an activity... – Joel Dec 29 '12 at 20:49
    
I guess I didn't think of it. My method is based off my previous Java experience, and it's not a very complex situation (I think). I wouldn't mind checking out how to do it as a service though. Can you recommend any tutorials in particular? – Argus9 Dec 29 '12 at 20:51
    
Well, that would be the android way of doing things. Its simple enough, googling 'android service tutorials' will give you plenty of help. If you want to try and work with your current solution, could you post more code? Is keepPlaying ever set to true again? – Joel Dec 29 '12 at 20:56
    
Thanks Joel, I'll check out Services, but I'll go ahead and post a more complete code sample above. – Argus9 Dec 29 '12 at 22:47
1  
yes.. onCreate() must be called before onStop()... – Joel Dec 30 '12 at 2:52

I came up with a solution that doesn't involve services - for a simple, small app, this works perfectly fine.

You'll need to create a public int variable that keeps track of how many activities want to play music for the MediaPlayer, which I achieved by placing it in a .java file named GlobalVariables:

public int activitiesPlaying;

Make sure to initialize this int to 0. In my case, I had this step done at the main menu Activity, in its onStart() method such that returning to the main menu stops the music.

GlobalVariables.activitiesPlaying = 0;

From then on, all it takes is to manipulate each Activity's onStart() and onStop() methods for each Activity that you want to play music. In my case, the music should play when the Activity starts, so onStart() was fairly simple:

public void onStart(){
    super.onStart();

    GlobalVariables.activitiesPlaying++;
    GlobalVariables.mPlayer.start(); // MediaPlayer is stored in GlobalVariables
}

onStop() is similar but needs to check the value of ActivitiesPlaying. First, since the Activity is stopping, we decrement activitesPlaying. If it's <= 0, pause music playback, and for housekeeping, set activitiesPlaying back to 0 in case it gets set to a negative value for some reason. It's probably not necessary, but a stitch in time and all that.

public void onStop(){
    super.onStop();

    GlobalVariables.activitiesPlaying--;

    if(GlobalVariables.activitiesPlaying <= 0){
        GlobalVariables.activitiesPlaying = 0;
        GlobalVariables.mPlayer.pause();
    }
}

Due to the order of the activity lifecycle, it's not possible to just use a boolean value as I tried above, since it will be set to true when the next activity is started, but will be set to false before the check to see if the MediaPlayer should keep playing. However, using an integer value makes this decision more flexible, since as long as it's greater than 0, the music will keep playing.

I realize it's possible to use Services to achieve a similar result, and I'd encourage everyone looking into this issue to consider it. But given my programming background and lack of familiarity with custom services, this solution made the most sense to me.

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