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What is wrong with this code:

using System;
namespace app1
{
    static class Program
    {
        static int x = 0;
        static void Main()
        {
            fn1();
        }
        static void fn1()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(x++);
            fn1();
        }
    }
}

I compile this piece of code using this command:

csc /warn:0 /out:app4noex.exe app4.cs

When I double click on the exe, it doesn't seem to throw the exception (StackOverFlowException), and keep running forever.

Using visual studio command prompt 2010, but I also have vs 2012 installed on the system, all up to date.

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5  
check out "tail recursion" –  dasblinkenlight Dec 29 '12 at 20:50
1  
Perhaps it will if you remove the logging output (which takes ages) –  Jan Dvorak Dec 29 '12 at 20:50
    
@dasblinkenlight do you think the compiler is this smart? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 29 '12 at 20:50
3  
Tail recursive calls (like this one) are optimized away in the x64 jitter but not in x86. –  mike z Dec 29 '12 at 21:00
1  
@JanDvorak see this excellent post for details: community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2010/07/07/… –  mike z Dec 29 '12 at 21:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Because the optimizer unrolls the tail recursion call into:

    static void fn1()
    {
      START:

        Console.WriteLine(x++);
        GOTO START;
    }

Rewrite to get exceptions like so:

   static int y;

   static void fn1()
   {
       Console.WriteLine(x++);
       fn1();
       Console.WriteLine(y++);
   }
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verified, or just theory? –  Jan Dvorak Dec 29 '12 at 20:52
2  
Verified by the author who does not get the exception. But tail recursion is a well-known optimization, now does CLR jitter do it? according to the querent it does. –  itadapter Dec 29 '12 at 20:54
    
It would be worthwhile to dismiss the other alternatives first before jumping to conclusions. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 29 '12 at 20:56
    
I think the behaviour is processor dependent. IIRC, this won't get turned into a tail call on x86 –  spender Dec 29 '12 at 20:58
1  
I spoke too soon... blogs.msdn.com/b/clrcodegeneration/archive/2009/05/11/… Looks like things have changed since I ran into this. –  spender Dec 29 '12 at 21:00

The x64 jitter is detecting this as a tail call and optimizing it away while the x86 jitter does not do this. The x64 jitter is more aggressive about these optmizations. See Bart de Smet's analysis and the CLR team's blog post on it.

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great blog link mike! Thanks –  itadapter Dec 29 '12 at 21:10

There is such a thing called tail recursive optimization.

From a stack perspective, basically it means that if the last thing an method does is call another method, the new call can take the stack frame of the calling method. For example in:

static void Main()
{
  fn(0);
}

static void fn(int value)
{
   fn(value+1);
}

instead of the call stack growing Main->fn(0)->fn(1)->... ad nauseam, it will be at exactly two links long, first Main->fn(0) than Main->fn(1), up to Main->fn(int.MaxValue) where it will either blow up or overflow.

Now, the question is, does the C# compiler actually does this?
AFAIK, using the 4.0 and later C# compilers, when compiling in a x86 environment, it does not use tail-call optimization, and when compiling x64 application, it does use tail-call optimization (and apparently, from the other comments/answers I'm correct). E.g. On my system, using LINQPad, the code you provided promptly blew up with a StackOverflowException.

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When program runs in visual studio environment , it will uses a limited stack deep. I mean that when you compile a program in VS2012 by hitting F5 and F6 on keyboard, it will send some parameters to csc.exe program to limit the program and cause the stack-over-flow to aware you of bug that is into your program source code & algorithm. In reality , there is no Stack-over-flow error, program's process will use real storage and virtual storage and OS will done it for you.

Note : it is also related to your os , some os will throw an error if they are weakness on memory management and cpu scheduling .

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