Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class A which contains a final int, valA.

I have a subclass B which contains a large final object, objB.

The value of valA depends on objB which is passed in with B's constuctor.

How can I create an instance of B?

I've included minimal code for what I'm trying to do.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println(new B(3).valA);
    }
    static class A{
        final int valA;
        A(int valA) {
            this.valA = valA;
        }
    }
    static class B extends A{
        final Object objB;
        B(int initVal) {
            this.objB = someMethod(initVal);
            super(objB.hashCode()+1);
        }
    }
    Object someMethod(int initVal){
        // pretend there's some super complicated logic that returns a large object
        return new Object();
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
have you switched the order of these lines: this.valB = valB; super(valB+1); ? –  jlordo Dec 29 '12 at 21:16
    
Yes very sorry, I dumbed down my original problem too much. The subclasses final variable is actually a very large object, not an int. So I want to instantiate it only once, use it to create the final int valA, but still have that object around as an instance variable. –  ahbutfore Dec 29 '12 at 21:33
1  
You can't win here - the super call must be the first thing in a constructor, and the compiler won't let you make reference to this in the B constructor (which includes calling non-static methods of B) until after the super call has returned. –  Ian Roberts Dec 29 '12 at 21:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The super constructor call has to be the first statement in your constructor. Hence, B should look like this:

static class B extends A{
    final int valB;
    B(int valB) {
        super(valB+1);
        this.valB = valB;
    }
}

Besides, you cannot make any references to instance methods from the super constructor call. You could make initC() a static method, but that would defeat its purpose, as you could no longer assign instance variables from within initC()

Given the updated question...

You cannot work around this initialisation problem, which is actually a design problem. I suggest you extract the construction of your very large object to an external "Factory" and reduce the complexity of A's and B's initialisation, keeping constructors as slim as possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Very sorry, in minimizing my problem for posting I actually made it too simple. I edited the code to more accurately represent the problem. valB is actually a large object (large as in I only want to instantiate it once), not an int. –  ahbutfore Dec 29 '12 at 21:29
    
@ahbutfore: I understand. I tend to run into this problem quite often, myself. See the updated answer –  Lukas Eder Dec 29 '12 at 21:49

You could use an overloaded constructor in B. In code below someMethod has been made static, alternatively it could be a final member method in B.

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        System.out.println(new B(3).valA);
    }
    static class A{
        final int valA;
        A(int valA) {
            this.valA = valA;
        }
    }
    static class B extends A{
        final Object objB;
        B(int initVal) {
            this(someMethod(initVal));
        }
        private B(Object objB) {
            super(objB.hashCode()+1);
            this.objB = objB;
        }
    }
    static Object someMethod(int initVal){
        // pretend there's some super complicated logic that returns a large object
        return new Object();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.