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I have a global pointer variable

char* pointer = new char[500];
/* some operations... */

there is a seperate FreeGlobal() function that does free up the pointer as below:

delete[] pointer;

First time when the function is called, it actually frees up the memory and now the pointer is a bad pointer. But when we call this more than once, it throws an exception.

Is there a way to check the pointer variable before calling delete [] again? What are the work arounds? Is this a bad practice?

Thank you.

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1  
As a related question, I know that free() does nothing if the parameter is NULL, does delete do nothing if its parameter is NULL, or do you have to explicitly check for NULL? –  KFro Sep 11 '09 at 1:49
3  
As I said in response to David Andres's answer, no, deleting NULL has no impact. I'm truly surprised how many of these answers are checking for NULL-ness for deletion. –  GRB Sep 11 '09 at 1:50
    
Ah, thanks GRB...i see you answer below. –  KFro Sep 11 '09 at 1:50
    
Using global pointer variables are very dangerous! This is a bad practice. Take advantage of C++ OOP! –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:29
    
You would not be having that problem if you were not using global pointer variables –  Partial Sep 26 '09 at 1:31

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Set pointer to null after you delete it. You should not try to delete the same data more than once.

As mentioned by GRB in the comments for this post, it is perfectly safe to call delete[] NULL.

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3  
If you set the pointer to NULL, then the check before calling delete[] is unnecessary. The standard guarantees that deleting a null pointer is safe (and does nothing). –  GRB Sep 11 '09 at 1:47
3  
With all due respect, it really isn't. Given that delete NULL; is a perfectly safe operation, what would you be checking for? The primary danger when using delete is that you delete a pointer that has already been deleted, but there's no way to check for that beforehand if the pointer hasn't been set to NULL (precisely the problem this question is trying to solve). So, given that there's no useful check that makes your program any safer, I don't really understand the point. –  GRB Sep 11 '09 at 2:10
2  
delete NULL; is an invalid operation - just to be sure no-one gets that wrong. In any case, of course such an if would be totally useless. Better do assert(ptr != 0); if the invariant is that ptr cannot be 0, instead of an useless if - which will possibly let the bug go unnoticed. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 11 '09 at 2:24
1  
litb is right of course. If your code is even deleting NULL, you know you're doing something wrong. –  GRB Sep 11 '09 at 2:26
1  
@Partial Encapsulation is creating an abstraction by packaging data and functionality into an object. You can easily have a perfectly encapsulated global object, if your program requires it. You should use globals judiciously, but there is nothing "anti-OOP" about them. –  Dima Sep 11 '09 at 3:25

I would suggest you actually fix your code. Double deleting something is a terrible thing to do. Rather than make hackish routines to let this happen, fix the real problem: no more double deletes.

Find out why you're deleting something twice, and stop it from happening. This would probably be easier if you weren't using global variables. If you need a global resource, use a singleton.

Additionally, use a std::vector<char>, or boost::array<char, 100>, so you don't need to worry about memory. You can't accidentally delete something twice if you don't have to worry about (or access to) deleting it.

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I suspect I'll get downvoted for this because it doesn't really answer his question, but I felt it needed to be said. –  GManNickG Sep 11 '09 at 2:42
1  
+1 Your absolutely right! –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:48
    
no no. Thanks. I asked "is this a bad practice?". –  bugboy Sep 11 '09 at 6:37

delete on a bad pointer results in Undefined Behavior. You're lucky that it threw an exception, but you certainly shouldn't rely on that happening. To prevent it, simply set the pointer to 0 after the delete. It's safe to delete a null pointer (in case FreeGlobal() gets called more than once), so you don't have to do any if-test.

void FreeGlobal()
{
    delete [] pointer;
    pointer = 0;
}
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-1 For not using OOP. –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:44
2  
+1 For answering the question directly, without saying something wrong (like saying "delete [] NULL" would be OK or something along that way) and for saying that the exception throwing was just random. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 11 '09 at 3:00
2  
@Partial ...huh? The program uses a global pointer to a dynamically allocated object. This is the right way to delete the object. What's "not OOP" about this? BTW, you do realize that C++ supports programming paradigms other than OOP, do you not? –  Dima Sep 11 '09 at 3:05
    
@Dima: Yes, I do realize that it does support other paradigms than OOP. Of course this answer works but there are better ways of doing so! Why use C++ if you are not going to use OOP, generic programming and data abstraction? Have a look at Bjarne Stroustrup's site: research.att.com/~bs/C++.html –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 3:23
1  
Also, you should put the -1 onto the questioner's whatever, i think. This answer just answered the issue, it didn't say "don't use OOP" and it neither said "use global functions". And in any case, i prefer bug-free simple code to bugged "better" code :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 11 '09 at 3:34

You don't need to check if the pointer is null before calling delete or delete[]. Your function should look like this:

void freeGlobal(char*& ptr) {
    delete[] ptr;
    ptr = 0;
}

What I want to know is why this thing is global and not inside a class?

class buffer {
    char* buf;
    size_t size;
public:
    buffer(size_t n) : size(n), buf(new char[size]) {}
    ~buffer() { delete[] buf; buf = 0; }

    operator char*() { return buf; }
    char& operator[](size_t ofs) {
        assert(ofs >= 0 && ofs < size);
        return buf[ofs];
    }
};

There are probably a couple things wrong with my implementation as I just typing it in here. Another question is why you aren't using the std::string for this char buffer?

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+1 Taking advantage of C++'s Object Oriented Programming design is the best thing to do. In your situation, the class would have the responsibility of cleaning up on itself with the destructor. –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:27
    
+1. But there is still an issue: That will yield an ambiguity error if you do char c = b[0];, because of op[](char*,ptrdiff_t) (built-in operator) vs op[](buffer&,size_t) (your one). Putting a char *data() { return buf; } instead of the conversion function would be a better idea, i think. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 11 '09 at 2:31
3  
Why not just use std::vector? –  GManNickG Sep 11 '09 at 2:43
    
@GMan: +1 That would make it a lot easier. On the other hand, perhaps bugboy wants to do a specialized array or just learn how it works. –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:51
1  
While the idea is good, that buffer class has a very serious flaw: If you (accidentally) copy such a buffer, delete[] will be called twice with the same pointer, invoking undefined behavior. If you're lucky, this blows up right away. If you're unlucky, it just messes up heap management and blows up later, when nothing wrong was done. Hours of fun finding such bugs... So what's the advantage of a quickly home-brewn buffer class over something tested and proven? –  sbi Sep 11 '09 at 8:42

Check this link out at the CERT Coding Standard Site. After freeing a variable you should set the pointer back to NULL since its not really pointing to anything anymore.

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Your freeGlobal() function should make it point to 0, so define the function as such:

//if ptr is not null, delete; otherwise, return
void freeGlobal(char*& ptr)
{
   if (ptr != 0)
   {
      delete[] ptr;
      ptr = 0;
   }
}

Edit: 0 == NULL, at least for now, in C++.

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3  
?? ptr is passed by value. Setting ptr=0 won't have any effect on the pointer that was passed to the function. –  mob Sep 11 '09 at 1:46
3  
That doesn't work. Try void freeGlobal(char*& ptr); instead. –  jmucchiello Sep 11 '09 at 1:46
4  
You don't need the if. delete and delete[] check for null internally as part of the language spec. –  jmucchiello Sep 11 '09 at 1:48
    
-1 Not using OOP –  Partial Sep 11 '09 at 2:47
3  
@Kristo: The missing & here wasn't a mere oversight that caused unnecessary copying. It caused the code to not to do what it set out to do. I'm very sure that merits down-votes. Anyway, since you fixed that error, I removed my down-vote. I'm still very tempted to down-vote it for that silly if(ptr!=0), though, because it's such a bad style. –  sbi Sep 11 '09 at 13:29

Pointers pointing to nowhere, should point to nowhere. pointer = null;

if (pointer != null) {
delete[] pointer;
pointer = null;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You don't need the if. delete and delete[] check for null internally as part of the language spec. –  jmucchiello Sep 11 '09 at 1:47
    
Which is not the case of free() or VirtualFree(). I rather explicit set it to null isntead of expecting occult and unsure behaviors. –  Havenard Sep 11 '09 at 13:21

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