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Right when I thought I had a hold on how prototypal inheritance works in JavaScript, I run into an issue I hadn't before considered.

Take a look at the following simple JavaScript code:

var Observable = function () {
  this.events = [];
};

Observable.prototype.addEvent = function (e) {
  this.events.push(e);
};

var Model = function () {};
Model.prototype = new Observable();

var appModel = new Model();
var taskModel = new Model();

appModel.addEvent('Hello');
taskModel.addEvent('World');

Looking at either appModel.events or taskModel.events yields the same array: ['Hello', 'World']. What I am looking to do is have each new Model have its own events array in as clean a fashion as possible. The following implementation of Model works:

var Model = function () {
  this.events = [];
};
Model.prototype = new Observable();

However, as more properties are added to Observable this becomes more unwieldy. I thought I could fix this as follows:

var Model = function () {
  this.prototype.constructor.apply(this, arguments);
};
Model.prototype = new Observable();

Alhtough as I'm sure those of you who are more experienced in JavaScript realize this throws an error: TypeError: Cannot read property 'constructor' of undefined.

In summary I am looking for a way for each new Model to inherit properties from Observable and for each Model to have its own events. I realize that this is very class-like, but I would like to know how to do this using only JavaScript prototype-based inheritance.

It is worth noting that I have looked at Dean Edward's Base.js. The following works:

var Observable = Base.extend({
  constructor: function () {
    this.events = [];
  },
  addEvent: function (e) {
    this.events.push(e);
  }
});

var Model = Observable.extend({
  constructor: function () {
    this.base();
  }
});

var appModel = new Model();
var taskModel = new Model();

appModel.addEvent('Hello');
taskModel.addEvent('World');

But the following doesn't:

var Observable = Base.extend({
  events: [],
  addEvent: function (e) {
    this.events.push(e);
  }
});

var Model = Observable.extend({
  constructor: function () {
    this.base();
  }
});

var appModel = new Model();
var taskModel = new Model();

appModel.addEvent('Hello');
taskModel.addEvent('World');

Besides the point, I would like to learn how to do this with JavaScript prototypes using no class libraries.

share|improve this question
    
And the question is.....? –  HMarioD Dec 29 '12 at 22:14
    
I was having this exact problem trying to build an Observable class. Surely we can't be the first to build this sort of thing in JS? –  Mims H. Wright Dec 20 '13 at 19:40

2 Answers 2

What I have understood here is that you want each instance to have their separate events array, If so follow the answer:

function Model(){
  this.events = [];
  this.addEvent = function(eventName){
    this.events.push(eventName);
  };
  this.getEvents = function(){
    return this.events;
  }
}

var m1 = new Model;
var m2 = new Model;
m1.addEvent("eve-1");
m2.addEvent("eve-2");
m1.getEvents(); //["eve-1"]
m2.getEvents(); //["eve-2"]

In your case you are adding events directly to the prototype not the instances hence they are added across all the instances...I hope this should help

share|improve this answer
    
What I am trying to do is get common behavior across multiple types of objects which share that common behavior. Although I did not create anything but Model, the intention is to create more types which share the same functionality, but not the same events. Keeping the methods on the Observable prototype makes sense to me but I want a way to not have to declare this.events = []; in every constructor function I create. –  user1937128 Dec 29 '12 at 22:36
    
All those things that needs to be common should be added to prototype, and those variable events should be added as above... –  Mudassir Ali Dec 30 '12 at 9:51

I had tried this to fix my problem:

var Model = function () {
  this.prototype.constructor.apply(this, arguments);
};
Model.prototype = new Observable();

The actual solution is to do this:

var Model = function () {
  Model.prototype.constructor.apply(this, arguments);
};
Model.prototype = new Observable();

This will give each Model its own events array as well as give each Model any other properties that the Observable constructor creates. The small overhead here is that Model.prototype.events is an empty array that is never accessed.

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