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I have a class A. During the __init__ method of an instance of A;

I create these following two instances of classes B and C:

b = B()
c = C()

Once all's set, I need to call, within a method of B, a method from C.

Example:

Triggered:

b.call_c()

Does:

def call_c(self):
    parent.c.a_method_of_c()

What do I need to do to achieve this structure?

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There's nothing defined named parent for call_c() to use to execute the parent.c.a_method_of_c() call. It needs the name of something that is an instance of class C, this can be passed to it as an additional argument or it could be stored in the instance of a class B object referred to by its self argument. –  martineau Dec 29 '12 at 23:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is how this looks if you pass the A object to both B and C as a parent/container object:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.b = B(self)
        self.c = C(self)

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent

    def call_c(self):
        self.parent.c.a_method_of_c()

class C(object):
    def __init__(self, parent):
        self.parent = parent

    # whatever...

Or, you can just pass the C instance to B's initializer like this:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.c = C()
        self.b = B(self.c)

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, c):
        self.cobj = c

    def call_c(self):
        self.cobj.a_method_of_c()

class C(object):
    # whatever...

I like the second approach better, since it cuts out the dependencies of B and C on A, and the necessity of A to implement b and c attributes.

If B and C have to call methods on each other, you can still use A to make these associations, but keep B and C ignorant of A:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.b = B()
        self.c = C()
        self.b.cobj = self.c
        self.c.bobj = self.b

class B(object):
    def __init__(self, c):
        self.cobj = None

    def call_c(self):
        if self.cobj is not None:
            self.cobj.a_method_of_c()
        else:
            raise Exception("B instance not fully initialized")

class C(object):
    # similar to B

In general, your goal is to try to avoid or at least minimize these dependencies - have a parent know about a child, but a child be ignorant of the parent. Or a container knows its contained objects, but the contained objects do not know their container. Once you add circular references (back references to a parent or container object), things can get ugly in all kinds of surprising ways. A relationship can get corrupted when one of the links gets cleared but not the reflecting link. Or garbage-collection in circular relations can get tricky (handled in Python itself, but may not be handled if these objects and relations are persisted or replicated in a framework).

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Thank you very much @PaulMcGuire for this wonderful example. Excellent. –  Phil Dec 30 '12 at 0:37

You need to pass either of self or c to B() so that it can know about the other object.

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Ignacio, I tried passing the parent then doing parent.c but it failed. Could you please expand a little what do you mean, perhaps I made a mistake? I would paste code but I've been at this for over an hour now and I tried-deleted many ways. –  Phil Dec 29 '12 at 22:49
    
If you want to make objects available to methods other than the initializer then you need to store it on the object being initialized. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 30 '12 at 0:16

I need to call, within a method of B, a method from C.

Basically, if the method is not a class method or a static method, then calling a method always means that you have access to the (c) object of the C class.

Have a look at the example:

#!python3

class B:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __str__(self):
        return 'class B object with the value ' + str(self.value)    


class C:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value

    def __str__(self):
        return 'class C object with the value ' + str(self.value)    


class A:
    def __init__(self, value):
        self.value = value
        self.b = B(value * 2)
        self.c = C(value * 3)

    def __str__(self):
        lst = ['class A object with the value ' + str(self.value),
               '  containing the ' + self.b.__str__(),
               '  containing also the ' + str(self.c),
               ]
        return '\n'.join(lst)


a = A(1)
print(a)
print(a.b)
print(a.c)

The self.b.__str__() is the example of calling the method of the object of the B class from the method of the object of the A class. The str(self.c) is the same, only called indirectly via the str() function.

The following is displayed:

class A object with the value 1
  containing the class B object with the value 2
  containing also the class C object with the value 3
class B object with the value 2
class C object with the value 3
share|improve this answer
    
Amazing! Thank you very much for this excellent example! –  Phil Dec 30 '12 at 0:36

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