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This is baffling. I need to use a function CCountry::getName() in my program. The strange thing is, when testing to see if it works at all, it works in one place, but doesn't work two lines down, and I can't figure out why. For example...

while(line != "---" && line != "------")
    {
        CCountry *tempCountry = new CCountry(line);
        cout << tempCountry->getName() << flush;
        (*tempContinent).addCountry(*tempCountry);
        getline(filestr, line);

    }

Works. It lists all the country names in order. However...

    while(line != "---" && line != "------")
    {
        CCountry *tempCountry = new CCountry(line);
        (*tempContinent).addCountry(*tempCountry);
        getline(filestr, line);
        cout << tempCountry->getName() << flush;
    }

Does not work. It fails to print even one country name, instead throwing a seg fault my way at the line that calls getName().

For further reference here are the two functions, getName() and addCountry()

string CCountry::getName()
{
return *name;
}

and

void CContinent::addCountry(CCountry country)
{
(*countries).push_back(country);
}

Per request, here is the CCountry Constructor:

CCountry::CCountry(string in_name)
{
name = new string;
*name = in_name;
player = new int;
*player = -1;
units = new int;
*units = 0;
neighbors = new list<CCountry>;
}
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1  
It is normally helpful if you tag the question with the language you are asking about, to avoid people guessing. –  Oded Dec 29 '12 at 22:44
    
Well what do the 2 lines down contain? –  Cyral Dec 29 '12 at 22:46
    
Sorry new here. I'll do that from now on. –  SwiftCore Dec 29 '12 at 22:46
    
line is a string –  SwiftCore Dec 29 '12 at 22:47
1  
Do you know about the -> operator? You could do tempContinent->addCountry(*tempCountry) –  K-ballo Dec 29 '12 at 22:49

5 Answers 5

I could rattle off a long list of things wrong with this code, but the one causing your fault is ultimately because of the following:

Your CCountry class is not practicing the Rule of 3, which it must since it has dynamic allocated members. (which, btw, are not even needed).

You're adding your CCounty object to your continent via a member function that take the country by value. A shallow copy of the object is made at that time. You then push this into the container within the continent, which makes another shallow copy. On addCountry() exit the original shallow copy is destroyed, and in the process by the time you return to your calling code the internals of the CCountry object there have been destroyed. Thus your local (which should not have been dynamically allocated int he first place, btw) is officially hosed.

And guess what... So is the one in your continent container.

I would likely start by thinking about the CCountry object itself. Personally I would manage a CCountry's neighbors in the CContinent class rather than the CCountry, as that is where the collection of CCountry objects is managed anyway, but to each their own. If you decide to stick with the current model, a potential alternative for CCountry could be something like this:

class CCountry
{
public:
    CCountry(const std::string& name)
       : name(name), player(0), units(0)
    {
    }

    // properties
    const std::string& getName() const { return name; };
    int getPlayer() const { return player; };
    void setPlayer(int player) { this->player = player; };
    int getUnits() const { return units; };
    void setUnits(int units) { this->units = units; };

    // neighbor access
    const std::list<const CCountry*> getNeighbors() const
    {
        std::list<const CCountry*> res;
        for (auto it=neighbors.begin(); it != neighbors.end(); ++it)
            res.push_back(it->second);
        return res;
    }

    // adding a new neighbor
    void addNeighbor(const CCountry& other)
    {
        neighbors[ other.getName() ] = &other;
    }

private:
    std::string name;
    int player;
    int units;
    std::map<std::string, const CCountry*> neighbors;
};

But note: pursuing a model like this (and as you've seen, your original model), will have potential pitfalls, specifically the possibility that a CCountry could have a pointer to another CCountry that technically it doesn't own. This is why I would prefer neighbor-association be managed by the CContinent class itself, as it would own both the CCountry's and their neighbor associations.

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I suspect you've defined a CCountry destructor like this:

~CCountry() {
    delete name;
    delete player;
    delete units;
    delete neighbors;
}

But I suspect you have not defined a copy constructor for CCountry. That means the compiler is generating a copy constructor like this:

CCountry(CCountry const &that) :
    name(that.name),
    player(that.player),
    units(that.units),
    neighbors(that.neightbors)
{ }

Now, CContinent::addCountry is defined to take a CCountry, not a CCountry &. So when you do (*tempContinent).addCountry(*tempCountry), your program makes a (temporary) copy of *tempCountry by using that compiler-defined CCountry copy constructor.

So now your program has two separate instances of CCountry: one pointed to by tempCountry, and the other in CContinent::addCountry's country argument. But because of the way the compiler-defined copy constructor works, both instances have name member variables pointing to the same string instance.

When the temporary copy is deleted, its destructor deletes that string instance. Now the instance pointed to by tempCountry has a dangling pointer in its name member variable. When you try dereference that dangling pointer in getName, the behavior is undefined, and is causing your segmentation fault.

Change your name, player, units, and neighbors member variables to not be pointers. They should just be plain types, like this:

class CCountry {
    string name;
    int player;
    int units;
    list<CCountry *> neighbors;
};

You probably also want to change your functions to take references instead of copies.

share|improve this answer
    
@SwiftCore In this case, if you drop the pointers (and you almost certainly should), the compiler generated versions will do the right thing. But in any case, get a copy of Scott Meyers' Effective C++ and study it. It covers a number of such issues. And don't worry about coding until you've done your design: before you can decide what to do about copy and assignment, you have to know what the role of the class is in the application. Does it have identity, for example (in which case, you shouldn't be copying it). –  James Kanze Dec 29 '12 at 23:14

Is it possible that you have cause some sort of overwrite in the constructor of CCountry? Sounds like for me.

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2  
I'm not entirely sure this is a real answer... –  K-ballo Dec 29 '12 at 22:52
    
I have an overloaded constructor that takes no parameters for creating variable countries, but I don't think that's the problem. And if you mean that it gets called again... you can see the entire code. Where would I have called it again? –  SwiftCore Dec 29 '12 at 22:57

In your CCountry's constructor you allocate name with new string and in destructor you probably free it with delete name. I don't know why you need to do this, it may be simpler to store string instead of string* as a member name of CCountry. When you pass CCountry as argument to CContinent::addCountry temporary copy of it will be created and then removed which will cause deletion of CCountry::name which is shared between several instances of CCountry. To avoid this you need either use string instead of string* as a member name of CCountry or implement your own copy constructor of CCountry.

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I suspect that what you say is true, but how do you know? He carefully avoided showing us any of the interesting parts of his code, like the copy constructor or the destructor. –  James Kanze Dec 29 '12 at 23:10

There are a number of problems with this code, but for starters, does CCountry have value semantics or is it an entity type. In the first case, you shouldn't have pointers to it, or allocate it dynamically using new. And you should ensure that it can be correctly copied and assigned. In the second, you shouldn't pass it by value to CContinent::addCountry (and you should probably ban copy and assignment by making the copy constructor and assignment operators private, or by deriving from boost::noncopyable).

You do not show the definition of CCountry, but the way you initialize name suggests that you're assuming that std::string is an entity object. It's not—it has value semantics, and there is almost no case where you would have a pointer to a std;:string. (The one exception would be as a function parameter or return value, where you wanted to support a null pointer to indicate the absense of a value.) The same thing holds for player, units and neighbors: contexts where you would have a pointer to int or to a standard container are limited to cases where you need a null pointer to indicate the absense of a value.

You also do not show use the copy constructor, the assignment operator or the destructor. If you're deleting memory in the destructor, and do not have a copy constructor, this is the source of your problem. The compiler generated copy constructor does a shallow copy, which means that when you call CContinent::addCountry, you end up with two objects with the same pointers. When the argument is destructed, if it deletes anything, this invalidates the object passed as argument (which contains the same pointers). There are different ways to handle this, but in almost all cases, the most appropriate is to not use pointers. (The class std::string, for example, has a copy constructor which does a deep copy, so using it is no problem.)

Finally, on a totally unrelated issue: prepending your class names with C is not a good idea. Microsoft has adopted this convention for their class names (at least in some of their libraries), and any reader seeing a name like CCountry will assume that it is a class from one of the Microsoft libraries, and will try and find it in the Microsoft documentation, and not in your code.

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