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I am writing in c++ handling large amounts of streaming data containing information of millioins of nodes. I use vector to store each node's name and map for index.

Now the problem is that vector is taking much more memory than expected and their destruction is unexplainable.

Suppose somefile contains 1 million lines, each line more than 50 characters. Read them in twice and then check the memory usage of the process and the estimated memory usage by the vector. They differ in 60 MB. This is just a small projection of the bigger problem I have, and it may differ in GB scale.

I use VS2010 SP1 on Windows7 SP1 Ultimate 64bit compiling the program with x86 settings.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <fstream>
#include <Windows.h>
#include <Psapi.h>
using namespace std;

//#define COUNT 500000
int COUNT = 0;

vector<string> namesVector;
map<string,int> namesMap;
void ProcessStatistics()
{   
    PROCESS_MEMORY_COUNTERS memCounter;
    GetProcessMemoryInfo(GetCurrentProcess(),&memCounter,sizeof(memCounter));
    cout<<"Mem Usage by Process: "<<memCounter.WorkingSetSize * 1.0e-6f<<" MB."<<endl;
}
void VectorMemUsage()
{   
    COUNT = namesVector.size();
    int overhead = StringOverhead();
    double mem = 0;
    mem += sizeof(vector<string>);
    mem += overhead*COUNT;
    for(int i=0; i<COUNT; i++)
    {
        mem += namesVector[i].capacity();
    }
    cout<<"Calculated String Vector Usage: "<<mem * 1.0e-6f<<" MB of "<<COUNT<<" strings."<<endl;
}
int StringOverhead()
{
    int overhead = sizeof(string);
    cout<<"String overhead: "<<overhead<<" Bytes."<<endl;   
    return overhead;
}

void main(){
    const std::string infile = "somefile";
    ifstream infstream(infile);
    string s;   
    while(getline(infstream,s) != NULL)
    {
        namesVector.push_back(s);
        //namesMap.insert(pair<string,int>(s,namesVector.size()));
    }
    infstream.clear();
    infstream.seekg(0,ios::beg);    
    while(getline(infstream,s) != NULL)
    {
        namesVector.push_back(s);
        //namesMap.insert(pair<string,int>(s,namesVector.size()));
    }
    //Check process and vector memory usage:
    ProcessStatistics();
    VectorMemUsage();
    System("pause");

    //Release the vector.
    cout<<"Now releasing the memory..."<<endl;        
    //vector<string>(namesVector).swap(namesVector);
    //vector<string>().swap(namesVector); //Deallocate Vector
//map<string,int>().swap(namesMap);   //Deallocate Map
    cout<<"Capacity of vector "<<namesVector.capacity()<<endl;
    ProcessStatistics();
 }

The x86 version of the program output goes:

Mem Usage by Process: 336.523 MB.
String overhead: 28 Bytes.
Calculated String Vector Usage: 301.599 MB of 3385108 strings.
Press any key to continue . . .
Now releasing the memory...
Mem Usage by Process: 7.64314 MB.

When I call namesVector.shrink_to_fit() or vector(namesVector).swap(namesVector) idiom on vector, the vector capacity really decreases, but the memory usage went high, any one has idea to fix this? Is the swap trick supposed to be pointer swap? why would it involve memory copy and all and cause this?

Mem Usage by Process: 336.536 MB.
String overhead: 28 Bytes.
Calculated String Usage: 301.599 MB of 3385108 strings.
Vector Capacity is 3543306.
Calculated String Vector Usage: 315.693 MB of 3385108 strings.
Now releasing the memory...
Capacity of vector 3385108
Mem Usage by Process: 434.5 MB.

When I add a map for string index, unexpected behavior happened. When I call both vector().swap(namesVector) and map().swap(namesMap), the result is like this, which is pretty fine because the memory is released.

Mem Usage by Process: 534.778 MB.
String overhead: 28 Bytes.
Calculated String Usage: 301.599 MB of 3385108 strings.
Vector Capacity is 3543306.
Calculated String Vector Usage: 315.693 MB of 3385108 strings.
Press any key to continue . . .
Now releasing the memory...
Capacity of vector 0
Mem Usage by Process: 8.2903 MB.

But when I only call vector().swap(namesVector), the memory is partially released. By partial I mean it released less than the result above, which around 336 MB.

Mem Usage by Process: **534.77** MB.
String overhead: 28 Bytes.
Calculated String Usage: 301.599 MB of 3385108 strings.
Vector Capacity is 3543306.
Calculated String Vector Usage: 315.693 MB of 3385108 strings.
Press any key to continue . . .
Now releasing the memory...
Capacity of vector 0
Mem Usage by Process: **440.459** MB.

Or map().swap(namesMap), the memory is close to not released at all.

Mem Usage by Process: **534.774** MB.
String overhead: 28 Bytes.
Calculated String Usage: 301.599 MB of 3385108 strings.
Vector Capacity is 3543306.
Calculated String Vector Usage: 315.693 MB of 3385108 strings.
Press any key to continue . . .
Now releasing the memory...
Capacity of vector 3543306
Mem Usage by Process: **535.441** MB.

I can't explain what happened. Anyone has any idea what happened here?

Thanks for the help.

Best.

share|improve this question
    
Not that this is even the right way to do this, but as long as we're here.. isn't there a COUNT*sizeof(string) that should be in that summation as well? –  WhozCraig Dec 30 '12 at 4:08
    
@WhozCraig, Thanks for your attention. There is the line you mentioned. Have a closer then. –  Glenn Yu Dec 30 '12 at 5:34
3  
A std::vector is expected to consume more memory than the memory needed for the no of elements stored inside it. It pre-allocates memory since it needs to grow dynamically as per usage. –  Alok Save Dec 30 '12 at 5:38
    
Are you using sp1 on s2010 or not? if not, yes, string leaks 16 bytes of ram. if so, no. it does not. The size difference your encountering could be simply because of pointer size difference between 32 and 64 bit applications, such things are rather unavoidable. –  johnathon Dec 30 '12 at 7:02
    
@AlokSave, Thanks for the heads up. I have editted my question. –  Glenn Yu Dec 30 '12 at 10:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The memory leak tag is not appropriate here, there is never any leaked memory -- all memory is reachable and owned by objects that are still in scope. A memory leak implies lost memory that can never be freed because you have no reference to it.

In VectorMemUsage you should use overhead*namesVector.capacity() or you only count the populated vector elements, not the allocated but uninitialized memory. Why does that function use a global variable anyway? It would be better to write it as:

void VectorMemUsage()
{   
    int overhead = StringOverhead();
    double mem = 0;
    mem += sizeof(vector<string>);
    mem += overhead*namesVector.capacity();
    for(int i=0; i < namesVector.size(); i++)
    {
        mem += namesVector[i].capacity();
    }
    cout<<"Calculated String Vector Usage: "<<mem * 1.0e-6f<<" MB of " << namesVector.size() <<" strings."<<endl;
}

If you want to avoid unused capacity in the vector you need to know in advance how many elements it will have (i.e. how many lines are in the input file) and use reserve to pre-allocate exactly the right number of elements.

When I call shrink_to_fit or the swap idiom on vector, the vector capacity really decreases, but the memory usage went high, any one has idea to fix this? Is the swap trick supposed to be pointer swap?

No, it wouldn't reduce the allocated memory if that's all it did! It copies the elements to a new vector (which is only as big as required) then does a pointer swap. So the peak memory is higher because you temporarily have two copies of all the elements.

Or map().swap(), the memory is close to not released at all.

A vector doesn't release its memory unless you use the swap trick (or shrink_to_fit()), it keeps its current capacity and only reduces its size if you clear it. To free the unused capacity you must use the swap trick or shrink_to_fit(). So all the memory is still owned by the vector.

There's no point using the swap trick for std::map, a map never keeps allocated memory that isn't in use, so you can just do namesMap.clear() to release all the memory used by a map.

In summary, this is all completely expected, due to how the containers work. There are no leaks, you just have invalid assumptions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jonathan, you are right that I should multiply capacity, but I expanded it linearly with capacity/size because I was a little bit lazy. And the global var COUNT, too. Sorry about that. At first I used COUNT to take in fixed number of lines for test. In my scenario, I need to handle data stream so I wouldn't able to guess how much data would come. They are arbitrary. –  Glenn Yu Dec 30 '12 at 15:29
    
About the swap trick and shirnk_to_fit, I want to add that I called exactly those and what I saw was not peak memory but the final state, that's what haunts me. I saw inconsistent opinions whether you should use swap trick on std::map. So I tried both. Swap trick for map did work in my case.Thanks for your attention. –  Glenn Yu Dec 30 '12 at 15:32
    
The swap trick will work for maps, but it's not necessary and it's clearer and simpler to just call clear(). –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 30 '12 at 15:54
    
I want to add that I called exactly those and what I saw was not peak memory but the final state, that's what haunts me. It's not clear what code produces what output, because the code you showed doesn't correspond to the first output (the output doesn't show "Capacity of vector"), so I can't be sure you've accurately described the code that produced each output. –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 30 '12 at 17:42
    
@JonathanWakely does not swap on vc 10 just call the move constructor of the vectors? –  johnathon Dec 30 '12 at 19:05

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