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I have tried the following code on gcc 4.4.5 on Linux and gcc-llvm on Mac OSX(Xcode 4.2.1) and this. The below are the source and the generated disassembly of the relevant functions. (Added: compiled with gcc -O2 main.c)

#include <stdio.h>
__attribute__((noinline))
static void g(long num)
{
        long m, n;
        printf("%p %ld\n", &m, n);
        return g(num-1);
}
__attribute__((noinline))
static void h(long num)
{
        long m, n;
        printf("%ld %ld\n", m, n);
        return h(num-1);
}
__attribute__((noinline))
static void f(long * num)
{
        scanf("%ld", num);
        g(*num);
        h(*num);        
        return f(num);
}
int main(void)
{
        printf("int:%lu long:%lu unsigned:%lu\n", sizeof(int), sizeof(long), sizeof(unsigned));
        long num;
        f(&num);                 
        return 0;
}

08048430 <g>:
8048430:    55                   push   %ebp
8048431:    89 e5                mov    %esp,%ebp
8048433:    53                   push   %ebx
8048434:    89 c3                mov    %eax,%ebx
8048436:    83 ec 24             sub    $0x24,%esp
8048439:    8d 45 f4             lea    -0xc(%ebp),%eax
804843c:    c7 44 24 08 00 00 00 movl   $0x0,0x8(%esp)
8048443:    00 
8048444:    89 44 24 04          mov    %eax,0x4(%esp)
8048448:    c7 04 24 d0 85 04 08 movl   $0x80485d0,(%esp)
804844f:    e8 f0 fe ff ff       call   8048344 <printf@plt>
8048454:    8d 43 ff             lea    -0x1(%ebx),%eax
8048457:    e8 d4 ff ff ff       call   8048430 <g>
804845c:    83 c4 24             add    $0x24,%esp
804845f:    5b                   pop    %ebx
8048460:    5d                   pop    %ebp
8048461:    c3                   ret    
8048462:    8d b4 26 00 00 00 00 lea    0x0(%esi,%eiz,1),%esi
8048469:    8d bc 27 00 00 00 00 lea    0x0(%edi,%eiz,1),%edi

08048470 <h>:
8048470:    55                   push   %ebp
8048471:    89 e5                mov    %esp,%ebp
8048473:    83 ec 18             sub    $0x18,%esp
8048476:    66 90                xchg   %ax,%ax
8048478:    c7 44 24 08 00 00 00 movl   $0x0,0x8(%esp)
804847f:    00 
8048480:    c7 44 24 04 00 00 00 movl   $0x0,0x4(%esp)
8048487:    00 
8048488:    c7 04 24 d8 85 04 08 movl   $0x80485d8,(%esp)
804848f:    e8 b0 fe ff ff       call   8048344 <printf@plt>
8048494:    eb e2                jmp    8048478 <h+0x8>
8048496:    8d 76 00             lea    0x0(%esi),%esi
8048499:    8d bc 27 00 00 00 00 lea    0x0(%edi,%eiz,1),%edi

080484a0 <f>:
80484a0:    55                   push   %ebp
80484a1:    89 e5                mov    %esp,%ebp
80484a3:    53                   push   %ebx
80484a4:    89 c3                mov    %eax,%ebx
80484a6:    83 ec 14             sub    $0x14,%esp
80484a9:    8d b4 26 00 00 00 00 lea    0x0(%esi,%eiz,1),%esi
80484b0:    89 5c 24 04          mov    %ebx,0x4(%esp)
80484b4:    c7 04 24 e1 85 04 08 movl   $0x80485e1,(%esp)
80484bb:    e8 94 fe ff ff       call   8048354 <__isoc99_scanf@plt>
80484c0:    8b 03                mov    (%ebx),%eax
80484c2:    e8 69 ff ff ff       call   8048430 <g>
80484c7:    8b 03                mov    (%ebx),%eax
80484c9:    e8 a2 ff ff ff       call   8048470 <h>
80484ce:    eb e0                jmp    80484b0 <f+0x10>

We can see that g() and h() are mostly identical except the & (address of) operator beside the argument m of printf()(and the irrelevant %ld and %p). However, h() is tail-call optimized and g() is not. Why?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In g(), you're taking the address of a local variable and passing it to a function. A "sufficiently smart compiler" should realize that printf does not store that pointer. Instead, gcc and llvm assume that printf might store the pointer somewhere, so the call frame containing m might need to be "live" further down in the recursion. Therefore, no TCO.

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It's the & that does it. It tells the compiler that m should be stored on the stack. Even though it is passed to printf, the compiler has to assume that it might be accessed by somebody else and thus must the cleaned from the stack after the call to g.

In this particular case, as printf is known by the compiler (and it knows that it does not save pointers), it could probably be taught to perform this optimization.

For more info on this, look up 'escape anlysis'.

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