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I created a function that generates a bingo board and I want to return the bingo board.

as I didn't expect for , it doesn't work.

here is the function:

int** generateBoard() {
    int board[N][M], i, j , fillNum;
    Boolean exists = True;
    // initilize seed
    srand(time(NULL));
    // fill up..
    for(i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        for(j = 0; j < M; ++j) {
            exists = True;
            while(exists) {
                fillNum = rand()%MAX_RANGE + 1; // limit up to MAX_RANGE
                if(beenAdded(board, fillNum) == Exist) {
                    continue;
                } else {
                    board[i][j] = fillNum;
                    exists = False;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return board;
}

I have a compilcation error (the red subline) at "return board" line.

is there way to return a 2D array without using structs \ dynamic allocations?

I'm using Microsoft Visual C++ Express 2010.

share|improve this question
    
use malloc for board 2D array allocation, –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 30 '12 at 6:29
    
I can't , this is homework .. if I would able to , I would do that.. –  Billie Dec 30 '12 at 6:31
1  
You better. Right now you're returning a local variable that is no longer valid on exiting function scope. Its undefined behavior. is in-out param acceptable ? –  WhozCraig Dec 30 '12 at 6:32
    
No, because we didn't learn pointers yet. (even though I did ..). anyway, do so in function didn't required. I just think it more clear.. –  Billie Dec 30 '12 at 6:36
1  
Is this function only ever called once? Did you learn the static keyword yet? –  Mike Dec 30 '12 at 6:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Someone has to own the memory of that board somewhere, and more importantly, that ownership must extend back to the caller of this function. Without dynamic allocation, your only other real alternative is to send it into the function as in in/out parameter.

void generateBoard(size_t N, size_t M, int board[N][M])
{
    int i, j , fillNum;
    Boolean exists = True;
    // initilize seed
    srand(time(NULL));
    // fill up..
    for(i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        for(j = 0; j < M; ++j) {
            exists = True;
            while(exists) {
                fillNum = rand()%MAX_RANGE + 1; // limit up to MAX_RANGE
                if(beenAdded(board, fillNum) == Exist) {
                    continue;
                } else {
                    board[i][j] = fillNum;
                    exists = False;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

and invoke like this from your caller:

int main()
{
    const size_t N = 10;
    const size_t M = 10;
    int board[N][M];

    generateBoard(N,M,board);

    ...
}

I would also consider relocatting the srand() call to the startup code in main(). It should ideally never be in some potentially repeat-callable function, and should be guaranteed to only be executed once per process execution. (note: I honestly can't remember if it is once per thread execution, but at this point in your coding learning curve I'm guessing multi-threading is not on the radar yet).

Finally, your random-fill loop is needlessly repetitious. There are better alternatives generating what you're apparently trying to do: create a random permutation of an existing set of numbers. As written you could spin for some time trying to fill those last few slots, depending on how much larger MAX_RANGE is compared to (N*M).

share|improve this answer
    
its a pass by value... –  muaaz Apr 18 at 13:24
1  
@muaaz Its an array. Its value is its address. I.e. it's passed by address, and running it would have demonstrated that. –  WhozCraig Apr 19 at 2:18
    
yes, got it.... thanks... –  muaaz Apr 19 at 17:18

You defined board as a local variable - its memory is dealoccated as the function goes out of scope.

You can declare the board global, or you can create it dynamically like so:

int **allocate_board(int Rows, int Cols)
{    
    // allocate Rows rows, each row is a pointer to int
    int **board = (int **)malloc(Rows * sizeof(int *)); 
    int row;

    // for each row allocate Cols ints
    for (row = 0; row < Rows; row++) {
        board[row] = (int *)malloc(Cols * sizeof(int));
    }

    return board;
}

You will need to dynamically free the board:

// you must supply the number of rows
void free_board(int **board, int Rows) 
{
    int row;

    // first free each row
    for (row = 0; row < Rows; row++) {
         free(board[row]);
    }

    // Eventually free the memory of the pointers to the rows
    free(board);
 }
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