Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Object class has both methods and functions meaning they both are accessed through Object.nameOfMethodOrFunction(). The following question What is the difference between a method and a function explains the difference between a method and and a function, but it doesn't explain how to create them within an object. For example, the code below defines the method sayHi. But how do you define a function inside the same object?

var johnDoe =
{
      fName : 'John',
      lName: 'Doe',
      sayHi: function()
      {
        return 'Hi There';
      }
};
share|improve this question
2  
A function is a method –  scartag Dec 30 '12 at 6:38
    
Maybe do you mean members and are you asking is their a constructor for an object? –  user1931103 Dec 30 '12 at 6:40
    
@scartag: a method is a function but not always the inverse. (square is a rectangle kind of philosophy). –  Brad Christie Dec 30 '12 at 6:45
    
@scartag: No, if you look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/kb6te8d3%28v=vs.94%29.aspx, you will see that methods and function are listed separately. So, there is a difference. –  user1888243 Dec 30 '12 at 6:45
    
in context of your question, they aren't really different. if you were to define a function inside same object, it would be a method, wouldn't it? –  scartag Dec 30 '12 at 6:46
show 5 more comments

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The following defines two classes, ClassA and ClassB, with equal functionality but different in nature:

function ClassA(name){
    this.name = name;
    // Defines method ClassA.say in a particular instance of ClassA
    this.say = function(){
        return "Hi, I am " + this.name;
    }
}

function ClassB(name){
    this.name = name;
}
// Defines method ClassB.say in the prototype of ClassB
ClassB.prototype.say = function(){
    return "Hi, I am " + this.name;
}

As shown below, they doesn't differ much in usage, and they are both "methods".

var a = new ClassA("Alex");
alert(a.say());
var b = new ClassB("John");
alert(b.say());

So now what you mean for "function", according to the msdn link that you gave as a comment, seems that "function" is just a "static method" like in C# or Java?

// So here is a "static method", or "function"?
ClassA.createWithRandomName = function(){
    return new ClassA("RandomName"); // Obviously not random, but just pretend it is.
}

var a2 = ClassA.createWithRandomName(); // Calling a "function"?
alert(a2.say()); // OK here we are still calling a method.

So this is what you have in your question:

var johnDoe =
{
      fName : 'John',
      lName: 'Doe',
      sayHi: function()
      {
        return 'Hi There';
      }
};

OK, this is an Object, but obviously not a class.

share|improve this answer
1  
Demo: jsfiddle.net/3cYsG –  Alvin Wong Dec 30 '12 at 7:02
    
Thanks Alvin. Is that the standard definition of static methods? Does ClassA.createWithRandomName() have access to this or other data within ClassA? –  user1888243 Dec 30 '12 at 7:07
1  
@user1888243 well, because JavaScript isn't strongly typed, what I've called "Class" is actually just a function and has its prototype. Everything except null and undefined are Objects. Probably see this question and its answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/7694501/… –  Alvin Wong Dec 30 '12 at 7:15
add comment

Quoting Aaron with "A method is on an object. A function is independent of an object".

Logically a method is useless without a "this" defined.

Consider this example:

var johnDoe =
{
    fName: 'John',
    lName: 'Doe',
    sayHi: function () {
        return 'Hi There, my name is ' + this.fName;
    }
};

function sayHi2() {
    return 'Hi There, my last name is ' + this.lName;
}

//Will print Hi there, my first name is John
alert(johnDoe.sayHi());

//An undefined will be seen since there is no defined "this" in SayHi2.
alert(sayHi2());

//Call it properly now, using the oject johnDoe for the "this"
//Will print Hi there, my last name is Doe.
alert(sayHi2.call(johnDoe));
share|improve this answer
add comment
var johnDoe = {
  fName: 'John',
  lName: 'Doe',
  sayHi: function(){
    function message(){ return 'Hi there'; }
    return message();
  }
};

That's about as good as you're going to get with the object declaration method of creating a 'class' in JavaScript. Just keep in mind that function is only valid within sayHi's scope.

However, if you use a function as a class structure, you have a little more flexibility:

var johnDoe = function(){
  this.publicFunction = function(){
  };
  var privateFunction = function(){
  };
};
var jd = new johnDoe();
jd.publicFunction(); // accessible
jd.privateFunction(); // inaccessible

(though both are really considered methods since they have access to the object's scope within).

share|improve this answer
    
jd->publicFunction() should be jd.publicFunction() :) –  DCoder Dec 30 '12 at 7:00
    
@DCoder: indeed; that's what I get for going between languages. ;p –  Brad Christie Dec 30 '12 at 16:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.