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Suppose we have a class Box as follows:

struct Base {}

template<typename T>
struct Box : Base
{
    template<typename... Args>
    Box(Args&&... args)
        : t(forward<Args>(args)...)
    {}

    T t;
}

And then we have a function MakeBox:

template<typename X>
Base* MakeBox(X&& x)
{
    return new Box<???>(forward<X>(x));
}

The type X is deduced from the parameter used in the call to MakeBox.

We then need to calculate somehow from X the appropriate "storage type" parameter T.

I think if we just naively use:

    return new Box<X>(forward<X>(x));

then this will cause problems.

Clearly std::bind and std::function need to deal with these problems, how do they do it?

Is std::decay helpful in anyway here?

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Isn't std::remove_reference<X> what you are looking for? –  jogojapan Dec 30 '12 at 7:56
    
@jogojapan: Is that what std::bind uses to store its bound parameters? –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 30 '12 at 7:57
3  
std::decay is exactly what you are looking for. –  Mankarse Dec 30 '12 at 8:03
    
So it's return new Box<decay<X>::type>(forward<X>(x))? The std::decay docs say "This is the type conversion applied to all function arguments when passed by value.". I am not sure I understand exactly what that means. –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 30 '12 at 8:06
    
Is the question about how bind works and what auxiliary functions it uses (which clearly depends on the implementation), or about how to deal with the situation in your code? –  jogojapan Dec 30 '12 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

If I understand correctly what you want to achieve, then you need to use std::decay. Supposing you are supplying an object of type S to MakeBox(), the universal reference X&& will be resolved in such a way to make the function argument either of type S& or S&& depending on whether your argument is (respectively) an lvalue or an rvalue.

To achieve this and due to C++11 rules for universal references, in the first case the template argument will be deduced as X=S& (here X would not be OK as an argument to Box<>, because your member variable has to be an object and not an object reference), while in the second case it will be deduced as X=S (here X would be fine as an argument to Box<>). By applying std::decay you will also implicitly apply std::remove_reference to the deduced type X before supplying it as a template argument to Box<>, you are going to make sure that X will always be equal S and never S& (please keep in mind, that X is never going to be deduced as S&& here, it will be either S or S&).

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct Base {};

template<typename T>
struct Box : Base
{
    template<typename... Args>
    Box(Args&&... args)
        : t(forward<Args>(args)...)
    {
    }

    T t;
};

template<typename X>
Base* MakeBox(X&& x)
{
    return new Box<typename decay<X>::type>(forward<X>(x));
}

struct S
{
    S() { cout << "Default constructor" << endl; }
    S(S const& s) { cout << "Copy constructor" << endl; }
    S(S&& s) { cout << "Move constructor" << endl; }
    ~S() { cout << "Destructor" << endl; }
};

S foo()
{
    S s;
    return s;
}

int main()
{
    S s;

    // Invoking with lvalue, will deduce X=S&, argument will be of type S&
    MakeBox(s);

    // Invoking with rvalue, will deduce X=S, argument will be of type S&&
    MakeBox(foo());

    return 0;
}

If you are interested, here is a very good lesson by Scott Meyers where he explains how universal references behave:

Scott Meyers on universal references

P.S.: This answer has been edited: my original answer suggested to use std::remove_reference<>, but std::decay turned out to be a better choice. Credits to the question poster @Andrew Tomazos FathomlingCorps, who pointed that out, and to @Mankarse, who first proposed it in a comment to the original question.

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What about std::decay? –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 31 '12 at 4:43
    
Indeed std::decay seems to be a good option, probably even better because it does include std::remove_reference<> as well. The reason why I did not consider it in the beginning is that it strips away the const qualifier, but then I realized you probably don't want to keep the const qualifier at all, since you are creating a new object inside of Box and calling its copy constructor. If so, we can indeed replace std::remove_reference with std::decay in my answer. I will do that and give proper credit. –  Andy Prowl Dec 31 '12 at 11:41
    
Btw, concerning function MakeBox<>() and class Box<>, are you sure you always want to call just the copy constructor of T all the time? You have an argument pack in the constructor of Box<> to forward the arguments to the constructor of T, but you are always passing just one T object in input so it always invokes the copy constructor. Shouldn't you have a variadic list also in MakeBox<>()? Btw, instead of returning a Base* I would return the exact pointer (Box<typename std::decay<T>::type>*) –  Andy Prowl Dec 31 '12 at 11:41
    
    
I think typename decay<typename remove_reference<T>::type>::type; is redundant there, as decay<> already includes remove_reference<>. See here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/decay –  Andy Prowl Dec 31 '12 at 11:45

For the provided example (1) does what you want and stores the value. For other cases (such as when x is an array) you can use std::decay to decay it to a pointer and store that.

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