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Javascript beginner here... trying to add functionality similar to the css pseudoclass "Active", but in vanilla javascript. I'm trying to change the color of a button when pressed, then restore the original color when the button is released. here's what I have:

myButton.addEventListener("mousedown", btnEvent);
myButton.addEventListener("mouseup", btnEvent);

...

btnEvent = function (e) {
    var storedColor;
    if (e.type == 'mousedown') {
        storedColor= e.target.style.backgroundColor;
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = someColorWhilePressed;
    } else if (e.type == 'mouseup') {
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = storedColor;
    };
};

This doesn't work, upon mouseup, 'storedColor' is undefined. I assume it's because the same function object is not shared but two are created? How can this be done? Is it possible for two or more event listeners attached to the same element to share a common target object (function) which can persist data between calls?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

Your variant does not work because storedColor is local variable and it is created every time btnEvent function is called.

You may store color in btnEvent function, because functions are objects in JavaScript.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/LQSe4/

var btnEvent = function (e) {
    if (e.type == 'mousedown') {
        btnEvent['storedColor'] = e.target.style.backgroundColor;
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = someColorWhilePressed;
    } else if (e.type == 'mouseup') {
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = btnEvent['storedColor'];
    };
};

myButton.addEventListener("mousedown", btnEvent);
myButton.addEventListener("mouseup", btnEvent);

Or you may store original color in DOM element (Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/rk33f/):

var btnEvent = function (e) {
    if (e.type == 'mousedown') {
        e.target['storedColor'] = e.target.style.backgroundColor;
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = '#F00';
    } else if (e.type == 'mouseup') {
        e.target.style.backgroundColor = e.target['storedColor'];
    };
};

var myButton = document.getElementById('btn');

myButton.addEventListener("mousedown", btnEvent);
myButton.addEventListener("mouseup", btnEvent);​
share|improve this answer
    
It's much more useful to also explain what you changed, and why. – T.J. Crowder Dec 30 '12 at 8:33
    
Storing the color on the function object is a very bad idea. Suppose you want to use the same function for more than one element? – T.J. Crowder Dec 30 '12 at 8:34

In this situation, where it's specific to an element, you're probably best storing the color on the element itself:

btnEvent = function (e) {
    var elm = e.target,
        color;

    if (e.type == 'mousedown') {
        elm.setAttribute("data-storedColor", e.target.style.backgroundColor);
        elm.style.backgroundColor = someColorWhilePressed;
    } else if (e.type == 'mouseup') {
        color = elm.getAttribute("data-storedColor"):
        if (color) {
            elm.style.backgroundColor = color;
            elm.removeAttribute("data-storedColor");
        }
    };
};

There, we're storing the color on a data-* attribute. You could also just use an "expando" property (an ad hoc property you assign to the element, e.g. elm.mySpecialProperty = ...), but expandos generally aren't best practice.


Side notes:

  • Unless you're declaring the btnEvent variable somewhere, you're falling prey to The Horror of Implicit Globals. Either put a var in front of it, or better yet, make it a function declaration rather than an expression:

    function btnEvent(e) {
        // ...implementation...
    }
    
  • addEventListener has a third argument, which you should probably supply. I seem to recall that some browsers are fussy about it (although any modern one probably isn't). (You'd want the value false.)

share|improve this answer

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