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how to assign string value in multidimensional array in c programming and send this value as function argument and return this value to main function. I try this but makes error ::

 char a[250][250][250];   // this not works
 a[][0][2] = "0";      // this not works
 a[][1][2] = "0";    // this not works

 char a[][2][2] = { "0", "1"};   //  this works
 a[i][j][max] = add_func( a[i][j][], i, j );    // error :  expected primary-expression before ']' token
share|improve this question
    
You're confusing characters and strings. Your array is array of chars, not strings. –  icepack Dec 30 '12 at 8:59
3  
15.6MB of string data. poor, poor stack. –  WhozCraig Dec 30 '12 at 9:01
1  
char *a[250][250] will save 96% space. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 30 '12 at 9:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After declaration you can not assign, but use strcpy()

char a[250][250][250];

strcpy(a[0][1],"0");

or assign at the time of declaration:

char a[250][250][250] = {"0","2"};  
char a[][250][250] = {"0","2"}; 

or if you want to assign a single char.

a[i][j][k] = '0'; 

Where i, j, k are any value less than 250


How to Declaration and Initialization 3D Array IN C

In-general a[3][4][2] is a three-dimension array, that can be view as

a[3][4][2] : Consist of 3 two-dimension arrays, where each 2-D array are consist of 4-rows and 2-colunms. can be declare as:

char a[3][4][2] =  { 
                       { //oth 2-D array 
                         {"0"},
                         {"1"},
                         {"2"},
                         {"4"}
                       },
                       { //1th 2-D Array
                         {"0"},
                         {"1"},
                         {"2"},
                         {"4"}
                       },
                       { //2nd 2-D array
                         {"0"},
                         {"1"},
                         {"2"},
                         {"4"}
                       },
                   };  

Note: "1" means two chars, one additional fro null ('\0') char.

If integer array:

int a[3][2][3]=  
        {
            { //oth 2-D array, consists of 2-rows and 3-cols
            {11, 12, 13},
            {17, 18, 19}
            },
            {//1th 2-D array, consists of 2-rows and 3-cols
            {21, 22, 23},
            {27, 28, 29}
            },
            {//2th 2-D array, consists of 2-rows and 3-cols
            {31, 32, 33},
            {37, 38, 39}
            },
        };

Link to understand


Second error:

to this a[i][j][max] a char can assign not string so,

a[i][j][max] = '0' ; // is correct  expression 

but

a[i][j][max] = "0";  // is not correct, wrong   

Please read WhozCraig comment. you are declaring huge memory in stack!


According to your comment :

function declaration:

char add_func(char a[250][250][250], int i, int j); // function definition  

try like this:

  char a[250][250][250];
  a[i][j][max] = add_func(a, i, j );
share|improve this answer
    
can you fixed the second error ? –  sabbir Dec 30 '12 at 9:01
    
@sabbir_pstu : Which passing to a function ? –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 30 '12 at 9:03
    
the present value of a[][][] will be passed to function as function parameter and return other multidimensional array variable. –  sabbir Dec 30 '12 at 9:08
    
@sabbir_pstu ok I guess it should be like add_func( a, i, j ); can't assign to a[i][j][max] –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 30 '12 at 9:10
    
@sabbir_pstu: you need to show definition of add_func, then I can help you. –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 30 '12 at 9:12

To initialize character strings table you can use curly braces. And the outer most dimension (I dont know how else can it be called) or the left most number in square is optional.

So this will work

char table[][3][10] = {
    {"row1-col1", "row1-col2", "row1-col3"},
    {"row2-col1", "row2-col2", "row2-col3"},
    {"row3-col1", "row3-col2", "row3-col3"},
    {"row4-col1", "row4-col2", "row4-col3"}
    };

You dont need to type table[4][3][10]. Compiler calculates it. The size of table is 120 bytes. As the contents are all string you can use

char *table[][3] = ...

This will save 20% space.

Curly braces can only be used in initializing phase. Not after that. hence following code will not work.

a[][0][2] = "0"; 
share|improve this answer
    
+1, and a mentor long ago called it the "superior" dimension of the array. All others he referred to as "inferior" dimensions. I've also seen them called "dominant" and "sub-dominant". –  WhozCraig Dec 30 '12 at 10:12

You probably would like to use pointers instead:

char *a[2][2] = { "0", "1", "2", "3" };
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming each entry isn't going to be altered, that will work. –  Mats Petersson Dec 30 '12 at 9:21
    
Definitely true. But you still can assign individual strings by constructs like a[i][j] = "something" or a[i][j] = strdup(something). –  CubeSchrauber Dec 30 '12 at 10:07

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