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This is Java. I understand that the assignment of 1 to index is in an initialization block that is first run when the class is instantiated, but why is this valid?

public class arr {
    {
        index = 1;
    }

    int index;

    void go() {
        System.out.println(++index);
    }
    public static void main(String [] args){
          new arr().go(); 
        }
    }

Output is 2.

I should be getting a symbol not found compilation error. Is this behaviour native to initialization blocks? In a normal scenario int index; should come before index = 1;.

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Good question... I knew static initializers were valid (ie, as in your program, except index is static and the code block is also preceded by the static keyword) but not that. –  fge Dec 30 '12 at 10:36
2  
Look in the Java Language Specification, and try to find a rule that this breaks - you won't find one. Compare that with the rules for local variables though, and things should become clearer... –  Jon Skeet Dec 30 '12 at 10:42
    
OP didn't specify how this relate to Java. –  Roman C Dec 30 '12 at 10:42
    
@RomanC The tags? –  Mob Dec 30 '12 at 10:43
1  
@RomanC The tags and System.out.println? –  Mob Dec 30 '12 at 10:47

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

+1, it looks really weird. But as a matter of fact non-static initialization blocks are simply inserted by javac into object constructors. If we decompile arr.class we will get the real code as

public class arr {
    int index;

    public arr() {
        index = 1;
    }

    void go() {
        System.out.println(++index);
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        (new arr()).go();
    }

}

to make more fun of consider this puzzle

public class A {
    int index;

    A() {
        index = 2;
    }

    {
        index = 1;
    }
}

what is new A().index ?. Correct answer is 2. See decompiled A.class

class A {
    int index;

    A() {
        index = 1;
        index = 2;
    }
}

that is, non-static initialization blocks come first in object constructors

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Correct. Non-static initialization blocks are frequently used in lieu of constructors (see JMock's Expectation) –  Alessandro Santini Dec 30 '12 at 10:44

Non-static initialization blocks run right after the constructor so the code is correct and the output as expected.

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But there's no constructor. . . Am I missing something? –  Mob Dec 30 '12 at 10:37
3  
There's an implicit constructor derived from java.lang.Object –  Alessandro Santini Dec 30 '12 at 10:38
    
A default constructor is added to every java class, that does not contain a constructor. –  Kevin Bowersox Dec 30 '12 at 10:38
    
@Mob there is always a no-argument, default constructor if none is declared –  fge Dec 30 '12 at 10:38
1  
You can always experiment: set index to 2 when declared and see what happens ;) –  fge Dec 30 '12 at 10:41

It doesn't matter what order the code is in. As you state,

In a normal scenario int index; should come before index = 1;

This is exactly what happens the field is declared and then the value 1 is assigned. The compiler does not care about the physical ordering of these items in the class.

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From Java Tutorial, The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

Here is an example of using a final method for initializing an instance variable:

    class Whatever {
        private varType myVar = initializeInstanceVariable();

        protected final varType initializeInstanceVariable() {

            // initialization code goes here
        }
    }
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The Java Tutorial states:

A class can have any number of static initialization blocks, and they can appear anywhere in the class body.

Furthermore it is the same with variables, which you can "use" before they are declared:

class T {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        T t = new T();
        System.out.println(t.a);
    }

    public int a = 14;
} 
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2  
The user is referring to a non-static initialization block, not a static one. –  Alessandro Santini Dec 30 '12 at 10:41
    
I missed this part, thanks. However the tutorial further states: "Initializer blocks for instance variables look just like static initializer blocks, but without the static keyword", so it seems the conclusion stays the same. –  Micha Wiedenmann Dec 30 '12 at 10:44
    
Just to clarify things, their positions in the execution order would be different. –  Sayo Oladeji Dec 30 '12 at 10:51
    
A life without static initializers much easier. –  Roman C Dec 30 '12 at 11:04

Unlike some languages (e.g. C), the order of declaration of class (static) variables and instance variables is not relevant in Java. You can refer to an class / instance variable (textually) before it has been declared. So even this is valid ...

public class X {
   private int a = b;
   private int b = a;
   ...
}

... though the initializers don't actually achieve anything useful.

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Java is such a language that fully parses your code before performing any stunt with it (I'm trying to avoid boring compiler details). So it doesn't matter if your initializer block comes before the declaration of the field, there is a specific order in which things take place. Class loading (and of course field loading), static initializers, constructors, non-static initializers are all run before any method call (static invokations can be performed without the execution of constructors and non-static members). You should consider reading some SCJP (now OCPJP) books like "K & B" to really know what's going on under the hood. A tutorial like "JVM internals" might be an overkill at this stage (but you should consider keeping it in your archive for later referencing).

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