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There are cases where one has pointers in an STL container and where less-than comparison shall not be made by pointer but by the objects pointed to. A simple example would be a vector which shall be sorted by the real numbers. Currently I solve this with:

template<class T_PTR> struct ltDeref
{
    bool operator()(T_PTR p0,T_PTR p1) const {return *p0<*p1;}
};

and use it as

vector<double*> vIn;
sort(vIn.begin(),vIn.end(),ltDeref<double*>());

or

set<double*,ltDeref<double*> > someSet;

Instead of writing my own comparison function, is there a more "standard" way in C++ which doesn't require a user made template?

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3  
why set<double*>` in set instead of just set<double> ? –  billz Dec 30 '12 at 10:46
2  
There are cases where one has pointers to pointers in an STL container. Shouldn't there be a standard solution in C++ which doesn't require a user made template? There are cases where one has pointers to pointers to pointers ... –  Praetorian Dec 30 '12 at 10:53
    
@billz This is a simple example to reduce the question to the minimum. You can replace double* by a pointer to some fat object that was created on the heap. –  Raffi Dec 30 '12 at 11:01
    
How should STL know how to implement compare operation from UDT? –  billz Dec 30 '12 at 11:06
    
@Praetorian Sure, but pointers in a container are an every-day thing while pointers to pointers are in most cases just a habit of people who programmed plain C before. Therefore I assumed that there is some feature in the language to dereference the first layer. –  Raffi Dec 30 '12 at 11:11

2 Answers 2

Often you can use the functors available in functional to construct a resulting sort functor purely from standard constructions.

But there is none to dereference a pointer T* so, you'll have to use your own comparator.


The closest you can get is when your "pointer type" is not a primitive, but some User-Defined-Type with an operator* that can be addressed.

The following code is C++11 (for the use of std::bind which is simpler than std::bind1st and std::bind2nd).

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

// Fakes a "smart pointer" wrapper around data
template <typename T>
struct Ptr
{
    Ptr(T data) : data(data) {};
    const T& operator*() const { return data; }

private:
    T data;
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<Ptr<double>> vIn;
    vIn.push_back(Ptr<double>(5));
    vIn.push_back(Ptr<double>(2));
    vIn.push_back(Ptr<double>(6));

    using namespace std::placeholders;
    std::sort(
        vIn.begin(),
        vIn.end(),
        std::bind(
            std::less<double>(),
            std::bind(&Ptr<double>::operator*, _1),
            std::bind(&Ptr<double>::operator*, _2)
        )
    );

    std::vector<Ptr<double>>::const_iterator it = vIn.begin(), end = vIn.end();
    for ( ; it != end; ++it)
        std::cout << ',' << **it;
}

As such, if instead of double* you have std::unique_ptr<double> or std::shared_ptr<double>, then this could work:

#include <vector>
#include <memory>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    typedef std::unique_ptr<double> STDUPD;

    std::vector<STDUPD> vIn;
    vIn.push_back(STDUPD(new double(5)));
    vIn.push_back(STDUPD(new double(2)));
    vIn.push_back(STDUPD(new double(6)));

    using namespace std::placeholders;
    std::sort(
        vIn.begin(),
        vIn.end(),
        std::bind(
            std::less<double>(),
            std::bind(&STDUPD::operator*, _1),
            std::bind(&STDUPD::operator*, _2)
        )
    );

    std::vector<STDUPD>::const_iterator it = vIn.begin(), end = vIn.end();
    for ( ; it != end; ++it)
        std::cout << ',' << **it;
}

Yet another reason to avoid "raw" pointers if you can...

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Thank you for your work. This is an interesting solution. –  Raffi Dec 30 '12 at 12:28
    
it is easier to use lambda instead of bind here: [](double* a, double* b) {return *a < *b;} –  Simon Dec 30 '12 at 13:10
    
@Simon: Except the point was to use existing standard constructs. :) Yours is a perfectly valid example but I was trying to do it without writing "new" types, per se. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 30 '12 at 17:11

There is no ready-made solution as other answers say. A raw-pointer dereferencing comparator could be improved slightly by making it only available for raw-pointer types with the following explicit template specialisation. I expect this would give slightly better error messages from the compiler in the event that a non-pointer type is used.

template<class T>
struct PointeeLess;

template<class T>
struct PointeeLess<T const *>
{
    bool operator()( T const * a , T const * b ) const { return *a < *b; }
};

OTOH, the template in the question will work for non raw-pointer types that implement operator*.

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