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I'm running a BIG PHP script, it might take a full day to finish its job,
this script grabs data from MySQL database and use it with curl to test stuff.. it does it with about 40,000 records..
So to make it run on background for as long as it needs, i used the terminal to execute it.. in the PHP script itself it has those settings to make sure it runs as long as possible until it finishes :

set_time_limit(0); // run without timeout limit

and because i execute it from another separated PHP script i use this function

ignore_user_abort(1); // ignore my abort

because executing it directly from the command line, it will give me two choices..
1 ) to wait till the script finishes
2 ) cancel the whole process

and after searching, there was an article that gives me a third choice and its to run it in background for longest possible by creating an external PHP script to excute the main BIG PHP script in background using this function:

exec("php bigfile.php");

that means i can open this external page normally from a browser and exit it without worry since ignore_user_abort will keep it running in background.. That's still not the problem

the problem is.. after an unknown period, the script stops its job.. how do i know ? I told it to write in an external file the current date time on each record it works on, so i refresh everytime to that external page to see if it stopped updating,

after an unknown period it actually stops for no reason, the script has nothing that says stop or anything.. and if anything wrong happened, i told it to skip the record ( nothing wrong happens tho, they all work in the same line, if one works then all should work )

However my main doubts are in the following :

  • Apache has a timeout that kills it
  • That was not the proper way to execute PHP script in background
  • There is a timeout somewhere, whether in PHP or Apache or (MySQL !?)
    that's where my biggest doubt goes.. MySQL, Would it ever stop giving records to the PHP loop from while ? Would it crash the whole script if an error occurred ? Does it has any timeout at anything that crashes the whole script ?

If none of those could apply to it, Is there any way to log what is exactly going on the script now ? Or why would it crash ? any detailed way to log everything ?


UPDATE:

I FOUND this in messages file in /var/log/ :

Dec 29 16:29:56 i0sa shutdown[5609]: shutting down for system halt
Dec 29 16:30:14 i0sa exiting on signal 15
Dec 29 16:30:28 i0sa syslogd 1.5.0#6: restart.
Dec 29 16:50:28 i0sa -- MARK --
            .....
Dec 29 18:50:31 i0sa -- MARK --
Dec 29 19:02:36 i0sa shutdown[3641]: shutting down for system halt
Dec 29 19:03:11 i0sa exiting on signal 15
Dec 29 19:03:48 i0sa syslogd 1.5.0#6: restart.

it says for system halt.. I'll try to make sure that this could be it in the future crashes and match times, COULD this be causing it ? and why ? memory_limit is 128M while i have 2GB of server memory ram, could this be it ?

P.S.: I restarted the server several times manually.. But this one says shutdown and halt ?

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1  
Did you try checking PHP, Apache and MySQL logs? –  ualinker Dec 30 '12 at 11:31
    
@ualinker yes thanks, i just did.. question updated –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 11:48
    
Shutting down for system halt is a kernel message written to the syslog when the machine itself is shut down. This of course would terminate your script as well.. This is most likely not the error you are looking for –  Michel Feldheim Dec 30 '12 at 11:58
    
Search in this file(fastcgi.conf)and changed it as the following below Server type="application/x-httpd-php" CommandLine="C:\Program Files\Zend\bin\php-cgi.exe" ConnectionTimeout="60" RequestTimeout="60" StartProcesses="8" Impersonate="1" SetEnv="PHP_FCGI_MAX_REQUESTS=10000" SetEnv="PHP_FCGI_CHILDREN=1" SetEnv="PATH=?" SetEnv="TEMP=C:\Program Files\Zend\Core For Oracle\temp" SetEnv="PROCESSOR_IDINTITY=HPR92500212345" SetEnv="OS=?" SetEnv="SystemRoot=?" SetEnv="ComSpec=?" MinDynamicServers 8 MaxDynamicServers 16 IpcDir "C:\Program Files\Zend\temp" –  wod Dec 30 '12 at 12:03
    
Server type="application/x-httpd-php" CommandLine="C:\Program Files\Zend\bin\php-cgi.exe" ConnectionTimeout="60" RequestTimeout="60" StartProcesses="8" Impersonate="1" SetEnv="PHP_FCGI_MAX_REQUESTS=10000" SetEnv="PHP_FCGI_CHILDREN=1" SetEnv="PATH=?" SetEnv="TEMP=C:\Program Files\Zend\Core For Oracle\temp" SetEnv="PROCESSOR_IDINTITY=HPR92500212345" SetEnv="OS=?" SetEnv="SystemRoot=?" SetEnv="ComSpec=?" MinDynamicServers 8 MaxDynamicServers 16 IpcDir "C:\Program Files\Zend\temp –  wod Dec 30 '12 at 12:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For such cases i use with success nohup command like this:

nohup php  /home/cron.php >/dev/null  2>&1 &

You can check after that if script is running with:

jobs -l

Note: When you use nohup command path for php file must to be absolute not relative. I think is not very graceful to call from one php file another php file only to prevent that execution to stop before finish work.

External reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nohup

Also make sure that you do not have memory leaks in your script, that make script after some time to crash because "out of memory".

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currently testing this solution.. where is the nohup log file located ? in case anything happened i can look it up –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 12:19
    
in my above form, that not be any log, but if you want logs you can redirect output of php execution to a log file something like this: nohup php /home/cron.php >/home/logs.txt 2>&1 & In this way if php crash i think you will be able to catch the error in logs.txt file. –  Moldovan Gheorghe Daniel Dec 30 '12 at 12:30
    
After few tries, I had to apply your way AND remove ignore_user_abort and also resort how curl works to close it after the loop, i left it working and it has been about 12 hours now, no problems or anything everything seems alright, thank you ! –  Osa Dec 31 '12 at 9:32

Have you tried using nohup?

exec("nohup php bigfile.php &");

If your host allow the nohup command, the command should run in the background and the script calling exec should continue immediately.

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Osa, your Apache will in all likelyhood have killed this and I could go into some detail about what possible causes are there, as others surely will. I will rather answer your problem instead of your question and advise you to use tmux for the task you describe (or screen if tmux is not available).

So what you would do is open up tmux and start the script from in there. detach with ctrl-b d and reattach later with tmux attach to see how far it is. While detached you can log out without stopping it.

For a short intro into other tmux stuff, that you don't yet need, but may help you understand the approach http://victorquinn.com/blog/2011/06/20/tmux/ or later http://blog.hawkhost.com/2010/06/28/tmux-the-terminal-multiplexer/ are quite ok

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Execution time is not the only thing to consider. Next likely culprit would be the script exceeding max_memory_limit

Have you checked/enabled your error logging? Could be failing silently.

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If you use Apache, there is a timeout about roughly 300 seconds. Call apache_reset_timeout(); regularly can allow a script to run forever if you don't stop it.

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Do i have to run this function on each loop record on normally on top? –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 11:41
    
You should run it in a loop. –  Licson Dec 30 '12 at 11:42

First of all i have faced this problem and resolved but i want to emphasis that your MySQL server isn't responsible about this hanging Only you need to change some settings in Apache.Put these below lines in the above of your PHP file.

ini_set('max_execution_time', 1000);
ini_set('memory_limit', '50M');
set_time_limit(0); 

and each fetching data should use :

$url_class = $URL_path;
//open connection
$ch_school_class = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch_school_class, CURLOPT_URL, $url_class);
$result_school_class = curl_exec($ch_school_class);
//clean up
curl_close($ch_school_class);

//Each fetch like this 
$url_class = $URL_path;
//open connection
$ch_school_class = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch_school_class, CURLOPT_URL, $url_class);
$result_school_class = curl_exec($ch_school_class);
//clean up
curl_close($ch_school_class);
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Your answer seems interesting.. Read the question update it could help guessing why –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 11:49
    
Calling a php script from command line does not involve apache at all. Also execution time 1000 < 0 (0 equals to ∞) –  Michel Feldheim Dec 30 '12 at 12:05
    
@MichelFeldheim i don't think its 'command line' literally.. if you read the question, i said i execute the command line from another PHP file, i guess that's apache-related –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 12:22
    
I realized that it was doing curl_exec multiple times ( 3 ) then close the curl, is it required to close and start new curl for each time i open an url ? –  Osa Dec 30 '12 at 14:06

1: Consider running the PHP script externally using popen(), pclose() etc..

2: You can shorten the length of your cURL requests using a multi curl handler

3: If possible, you should try doing it in a different language. PHP is known to be considerably slow for larger tasks. Why take all take all day when it can be done in only a few hours at the most (I say a few hours since it has to make network requests to 40,000 different addresses)

4: And, as many others have said, try using nohup if you can.

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Using ignore_user_abort to run a long-running script through apache is a dirty way to do it.

The simplest way is to use GNU screen, just type screen and you'll be attached to a new console inside your current console, launch your script then detach from the screen with ctrl-a d (full manual here), the screen will continue to work even if you get disconnected from your server.

To reattach to you screen, use screen -r and you'll get back to your running script.

The hardest way (and the cleanest way) is to rewrite your script to work as a system daemon, there's a lot of libs that can help you doing it, i suggest you to dig in pear's daemon lib (an example here).

As for the memory limit problem (?), before deciding to update the memory_limit configuration, you have to check if your script is consuming more ram than what's written in your current configuration, make a simple ps aux|grep php and look for the RSS column, that's all the memory your script is eating.

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