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I was wondering wether it was possible to find the average between a row of timestamps in SQL. I found some solutions on the internet. But in my case I don't want to include the differences that are longer then 4 hours. Is it possible to do this in MSQL? So for example the following timestamps:

12-12-12 18:00:00
12-12-12 17:50:00
12-12-12 17:30:00
12-12-12 11:00:00

Would make an average of: (20+10)/2=15

Is this possible?

Thanks in advance!

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3  
What does MSQL mean? Microsoft SQL = SQL Server? Or MySQL? Please fix typo and tag question accordingly. –  marc_s Dec 30 '12 at 12:09
1  
Yep, really need to know which database system we're talking about here, since the datetime functions are an area where they vary the most. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 30 '12 at 12:13
    
And MySQL has no window functions which can simplify a lot a solution for this question. –  ypercube Dec 30 '12 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

Imagine you have

12-12-12 18:00:00
12-12-12 17:50:00
12-12-12 17:30:00
12-12-12 11:00:00
12-12-12 10:50:00
12-12-12 10:30:00

and you don't want to include differences longer than 4 hours. Which timestamps would you reject? Hmm... You may build the total average, including all timestamps. Then you may calculate its variation and reject certain outliers. What would outliers be when looking at the row above? You'd have to either reject the entire morning cluster or the entire evening cluster. However, I'm sure none of those two is what you want. As a consequence you should consider the rejection criteria > 4 hours as a bad and find somthing more meaningful for what you desire.

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You are a little shy on information. Perhaps you could post your existing query so we get a better perspective?

I am assuming that you are referring to Microsoft SQL. I also expect that you have other identifiers to correlate the timestamps so I will let you determine how to limit your result set.

My initial suggestion would be to used a nested query:

--Sample Table
declare @TimeTable table ( RowId int Identity, Stamp datetime)
insert into @TimeTable select '12/1/2012 04:00'
insert into @TimeTable select '12/1/2012 04:30'
insert into @TimeTable select '12/1/2012 05:00'

--Test Query -  Find the next record
select Stamp,
    (
        select top 1 Stamp 
        from @TimeTable t2 
        where RowId > T1.RowId
    ) as CompareDate
from @TimeTable T1

--Test Query - Instead of dates, show difference in minutes
select
    datediff(n,
        Stamp,
            (
            select top 1 Stamp 
            from @TimeTable t2 
            where RowId > T1.RowId
            )
        ) as Mins
from @TimeTable T1

--Finally we average the result of minutes
select avg(AverageTable.Mins)
from 
    (
        select
            datediff(n,
                Stamp,
                    (
                    select top 1 Stamp 
                    from @TimeTable t2 
                    where RowId > T1.RowId
                    )
                ) as Mins
        from @TimeTable T1
    ) as AverageTable
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The idea is to find the largest timestamp less than the given timestamp on any row. The most SQL-compatible way of doing this is with a correlated subquery, which works in any database.

However, timestamps are not generally compatible across databases, and the functions for taking differences and comparing to constants are not standard. Here is one way in MySQL, which converts everything to seconds for the arithmetic:

select avg(TIME_TO_SEC(TIMEDIFF(TimeStamp, prevTimeStamp))
from (select t.*,
             (select max(t2.timestamp) from t t2 where t2.timestamp < t.timestamp) as prevTimeStamp
      from t
     ) t
where TIME_TO_SEC(TIMEDIFF(TimeStamp, prevTimeStamp) < 4*60*60

The subquery should work in any database. The time functions differ between databases.

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