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We have to implement first of all the Erode Algorithm which have to be work for binary and gray images.

Here is our code:incomplete

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>
#include "ErosionFilter.h"

/* Constructor. */
ErosionFilter::ErosionFilter()
{
 // Set structure element to NULL.
 m_StructureElement = NULL;
}

/* Destructor. */
ErosionFilter::~ErosionFilter()
{
 // Nothing to do here.
}

/* Set the structure element for the filter. */
void ErosionFilter::SetStructureElement(  StructureElement* structureElement )
{
  m_StructureElement = structureElement;
}

/* Execute the Erosion filter. */
bool ErosionFilter::Execute()
{
 // Check if structure element is set.
 if( m_StructureElement == NULL )
 {
  std::cout << "Error: No structure element set!" << std::endl;
  return false;
 }

// First, create a valid output image.
// This fails, if no valid input image is available.
if( !CreateOutputImage() )
{
 return false;
}



// We define few constants required for the filtering. It is more efficient to
// use constants instead of calling the member functions in each iteration.
const int kernelHalfSizeX = m_StructureElement->GetHalfSizeX();
const int kernelHalfSizeY = m_StructureElement->GetHalfSizeY();

// We cast the size to integer to avoid signed/unsigned warnings in the boundary checking.
const int imageSizeX = static_cast<int> ( m_InputImage->GetSizeX() );
const int imageSizeY = static_cast<int> ( m_InputImage->GetSizeY() );

// Iterate over all pixel coordinates.
for( int y = 0; y < imageSizeY; y++ )
{
 for( int x = 0; x < imageSizeX; x++ )
 {
  // Die Koordinaten des aktuellen Pixels sind jetzt gegeben als (x,y).

  // Iterate over all neighborhood pixel coordinates.
  for( int m = -kernelHalfSizeY; m <= kernelHalfSizeY; m++ )
  {
    // Compute the pixel y coordinate for this kernel row.
    int j = y + m;

    // Apply reflected boundary conditions if coordinate is outside the image.
    if( j < 0 )
    {
      j = -j - 1;
    }
    else if( j >= imageSizeY )
    {
      j = 2 * imageSizeY - j - 1;
    }

    for( int k = -kernelHalfSizeX; k <= kernelHalfSizeX; k++ )
    {
      // Compute the pixel x coordinate for this kernel column.
      int i = x + k;

      // Apply reflected boundary conditions if coordinate is outside the image.
      if( i < 0 )
      {
        i = -i - 1;
      }
      else if( i >= imageSizeX )
      {
        i = 2 * imageSizeX - i - 1;
      }

      // Die Koordinaten des Punktes in der Nachbarschaft des aktuellen Pixels (x,y)
      // sind jetzt gegeben als (i,j).
      // Die korrespondierende Position in der Maske ist (k,m).
      // Beachten Sie, dass auf die Koordinaten (i,j) schon die Randbedingungen
      // angewendet wurden.

    }
  }
  // You have to set the grayvalues for the output image.
  //for grayvalue images use min

  //for binary use logic AND for questioning if there are in the set

 }
}

return true;
}

My Question is if I can use the min max Operator for both types? Or should i make a case question if the current image is binary and then process the image?

share|improve this question
    
For discrete images you can use min/max for both, but in the binary case you will have to define A as being black, and B as being white, with A < B. It is not uncommon to represent the object as black points in an binary image, so consequently it is not uncommon for A > B, so you need to make that clear. Also, you are only dealing with square structuring elements here, I would suggest to rethink about the design used so far. –  mmgp Jan 8 '13 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

min/max is the most general formulation (since min is equivalent to AND and max to OR for {0, 1}). So it will work for both binary and grayscale. However there are specialized algorithms for binary images that perform faster.

If you want to write less code, use min/max. If your real focus is on binary images, use an if branch and search for fast binary morphology implementations (and possibly drop support for grayscale as well -- are you really going to use that in the end?)

share|improve this answer
    
yea thats what we have to do. so i will try an write the code:) –  Xeno1987 Dec 30 '12 at 15:03
    
min/max is not the most general formulation inf/sup or the equivalent is, but it does not matter here. –  mmgp Jan 8 '13 at 13:21
    
inf/sup for finite sets is min/max. So I take it you want to deal with infinite / continuous images with infinite grayscale intensity ranges. You can always generalize away aspects of the problem at hand (and obtain an "even more general" formulation that is irrelevant to the asker). –  dan3 Jan 13 '13 at 10:16

so i implement the rest but it does not do any eroding. Maybe i use the min function incorrectly, here is the updated part:

 min = m_InputImage->GetPixel(i,j);
      //max = m_InputImage->GetPixel(i,j);
      //printf("Min: %d\nMax: %d\nm: %d\nk: %d\n", min, max, m, k);

    }
  }
  // Sie muessen die Grauwerte des Ausgabebildes setzen.
  //für grauwert bilder verwende min

  //für binär verwende logisches UND zur abfrage ob in menge enthalten
  //printf("min: %d\n", min);
  m_OutputImage->SetPixel(x,y,min);
}

}

return true; }

share|improve this answer
    
min is declared above Image::PixelType min = std::numeric_limits<Image::PixelType>::min(); –  Xeno1987 Dec 30 '12 at 16:13
    
Maybe you should move your question to codereview.stackexchange.com at this point? You might also want to translate comments into english for greater exposure. –  dan3 Dec 30 '12 at 16:17
    
The min needs to be between the the current minimum intensity and the new one you found, your code never does that. –  mmgp Jan 8 '13 at 13:24

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