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Suppose I have the following dataset stored in a linkedlist (excluding the header):

ID | Name
1 | John
2 | Albert
3 | Simon

Now, I would like to sort the nodes according to, say, alphabetical order.

I would like to know how I can come up with my own sorting method without using Arrays (and similar stuff like Lists, Vectors, ArrayLists etc.) and without using a library sorting method (e.g. Collections.sort).

In other words, I would like to know the concept of sorting and how one should go about arranging the nodes in a systematic manner. It doesn't have to be efficient - it just has to work.

I'll be trying this out in Java but I would appreciate pseudocodes or tips / hints / other resources as well.

Thank you.


Addendum:

LinkedList.java

class LinkedList
{

    private Node head;  // first node in the linked list
    private int count;

    public int getCount()
    {
        return count;
    }

    public Node getHead()
    {
        return head;
    }

    public LinkedList()
    {
        head = null;    // creates an empty linked list
        count = 0;
    }

    public void deleteFromFront()
    {
        if (count > 0)
        {
            Node temp = head;
            head = temp.getLink();
            temp = null;
            count--;
        }
    }

    public void AddToFront(Object cd)
    {
        Node newNode = new Node(cd);
        newNode.setLink(head);
        head = newNode;
        count++;
    }

    public void RemoveAtPosition(int n)
    {
        int counter=1;
        Node previous=null;
        if(n==1)
            deleteFromFront();
        else if(n<=getCount())
            for(Node j=head;j!=null;j=j.getLink())
            {
                if(counter==n&&previous!=null)
                {
                    previous.setLink(j.getLink());
                    j.setLink(null);
                }
                previous=j;
                counter++;
            }
        else
            System.out.println("Unable to remove object at position "+n);
    }

    public void AddAtPosition(int n, Object cd)
    {
        int counter=1;
        Node newNode=new Node(cd);
        Node previous=null;
        for(Node j=head;j!=null;j=j.getLink())
        {
            if(counter==n&&previous!=null)
            {
                newNode.setLink(j.getLink());
                j.setLink(newNode);
            }
            previous=j;
            counter++;
        }
    }

    public void Swap(int n1, int n2)
    {
        // how do I swap nodes?
    }

    public void Sort()
    {
       // how do I sort nodes?
    }
}

Node.java

public class Node {

    private Object data;
    private Node link;

    public Object getData() {
        return data;
    }

    public void setData(Object data) {
        this.data = data;
    }

    public Node getLink() {
        return link;
    }

    public void setLink(Node link) {
        this.link = link;
    }

    public Node(Object data) {
        this.data = data;
        this.link = null;
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
    
Search for "bubble sort" if you are new to sorting concept. May it be easy for a beginner since the efficiency is not important for you. – phantasmagoria Dec 30 '12 at 15:28
    
Mm - I think I must've phrased my question wrongly. I do have the sorting algorithm but I'm having difficulties manipulating the nodes in the linked list structure. – JTJM Dec 30 '12 at 15:30
    
Are you using Java's LinkedList, or did you make something yourself? – bowmore Dec 30 '12 at 15:34
1  
Then we'd like to see that code, otherwise, we can't really tell what your problem is – bowmore Dec 30 '12 at 15:35

If you want to do it yourself, insertion sort is really easy on linked lists. Create a new empty linked list, then insert all elements from the old one into it. Wikipedia has a C code example.

share|improve this answer

If you want to know how the JDK does it... I copies the list into an array, sorts that and copies it back.

You can use a bubble sort for a linked list but it will be slower, so it makes no sense, unless you like pain. ;)

share|improve this answer

I realize you say you don't want to use Collections.sort, but just to make sure: you do realize that Collections.sort allows you to implement for yourself the sorting order, right? If not, http://www.digizol.com/2008/07/java-sorting-comparator-vs-comparable.html (and many other resources) will provide info on that.

Otherwise, there are a lot of sorting algorithms you can implement. One of the easier to understand is Bubble Sort. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort contains a good explanation of it, including a nice visualization of the different sorting steps.

But Bubble Sort isn't (at all) an efficient way of sorting. There are many other sorting algorithms (merge sort, insertion sort, quicksort, ... see Wikipedia's article on "Sorting algorithm" for an overview), and they each have their advantages and disadvantages. It depends on the data you're sorting which algorithm will fit best.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand :) I'm trying to grasp the following: (1) Manipulation of nodes in Linked Lists. (2) Implementing sorting algorithm. Purely for conceptual purpose. I'm trying to understand how this works. – JTJM Dec 30 '12 at 15:46

You can copy the list into an array and sort that. Otherwise, there are various sorting algorithms that can be used i.e. merge sort, bubble sort etc.

You can see this for merge sort implementation.

share|improve this answer

While not exactly the same, look at external sorts (where the data isn't loaded into memory; for example, you want to sort a file bigger than your RAM). They generally work by moving data between files, in a manner similar to how you might move nodes between linked lists.

share|improve this answer

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