Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to increment the html value of a <span> when a button is clicked, but jQuery is saying that the value of the <span> is undefined, even though there is a number physically being shown on the page. Here is the PHP section that generates the HTML:

echo '<div class="box" style="background-color:'.$colours[0].'">
      <p>'.$confessions[0].'<br></p><br>
      <div class="overlay"></div>
      <div class="slide">
        <div class="slideleft">#'.$ids[0].'</div>
        <div class="slideright">
            <span class="upvote" id="'.$ids[0].'">Upvote</span>
            <span class="counter" id="'.$ids[0].'">"'.$counter[0].'"</span>
        </div>
      </div>
      </div>'

and here is the jQuery that is supposed to magic up the HTML:

$("body").on("click", ".upvote", function(e) {
    $.ajax({
        url: 'vote.php',
        data: {
            type: 'up',
            id: $(this).attr('id')
        },
        type: 'post',
        success: function(data) {
            if (data == 'ok') {
                alert($(this).next().html());
            } else {};
        }
    });
});

It does make an alert when the upvote button is pressed, but its value is undefined as opposed to the actual number. Can anyone shed some light on this issue?

Thanks

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

$(this) won't contain the clicked element any more as it becomes out of scope whilst inside your success function, instead you will need to cache the variable for use inside your success function.

For example:

$("body").on("click", ".upvote", function(e){
    var clicked = $(this);
    $.ajax({ 
        url: 'vote.php',
        data: { type: 'up', id: clicked.attr('id') },
        type: 'post',
        success: function(data) {
            if(data == 'ok'){
                alert(clicked.next().html());
            } else {
            };
        }
    });   
});
share|improve this answer
    
It works, thanks! –  Taimur Dec 30 '12 at 16:12
    
You can use the context option inside the ajax object. { url: ..., context: this} –  Trevor Dec 30 '12 at 16:14
2  
It's also a good practice to prefix any jQuery objects with $. So $clicked –  Trevor Dec 30 '12 at 22:05

Your problem is that this is not what you expect; in the "success" callback, this has been rebound to the jqXHR object- and getting its next() is what's returning undefined.

I recommend explicit capture to solve this problem:

$("body").on("click", ".upvote", function(e){
    var self = this; /// capture "this" explicitly here
    $.ajax({ 
        url: 'vote.php',
        data: { type: 'up', id: $(this).attr('id') },
        type: 'post',
        success: function(data) {
                    if(data == 'ok'){
                    alert($(self).next().html()); /// so now it is available here
                  } else {
                  }
        }
    });   
});
share|improve this answer
    
Or use the context option to pass in this –  Trevor Dec 30 '12 at 16:49

I think that $(this) isn't referencing your DOM element here. Before the ajax function try adding

var elem = $('.upvote');

And using

elem rather than $(this) in the ajax function.

share|improve this answer
    
or use the context option to pass in this –  Trevor Dec 30 '12 at 16:49
    
Oh, @Trevor this sounds like something I need to learn. Please can you edit my answer with that? - or provide your own and i'll up-vote. –  Adam Waite Dec 30 '12 at 17:01
    
I posted it :).. –  Trevor Dec 30 '12 at 17:14

pass this as the context for it to applied in methods to ajax

No need to make a new var to access this

Check out the docs: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

 $("body").on("click", ".upvote", function(e){

        $.ajax({ 
            url: 'vote.php',
            context: this, // capture this here instead
            data: { type: 'up', id: $(this).attr('id') },
            type: 'post',
            success: function(data) {
                if(data == 'ok'){
                    alert($(this).next().html()); /// so now it is available here
                } 
            }
        });   
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this should prove helpful. –  Adam Waite Dec 30 '12 at 23:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.