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I have a MySQL table with 140 columns and a txt file with about 80k lines, i.e. 7.5k entries(rows) for the table.

which would be faster?

"insert into myTable (<140 column names>) values (<140 column entries>);" Shall i enter one whole row at a time(just one database transaction per row, but as there are 140 columns the lone insert statement will be very long)

or

"update myTable set = where =...;" enter a column entry one by one(making many database transactions)

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"I have a MySQL table with 140 columns" ... And then you used the word "faster". Interesting. –  Brian Roach Dec 30 '12 at 17:39
    
relativity, my friend. –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:47
    
In-memory string operations are several orders of magnitude faster than calling the database. To understand why, see the following: stackoverflow.com/a/13975668/1919251 –  parsifal Dec 31 '12 at 16:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The fewer commits/queries that are ran, the faster it will be. Play around with different chunk sizes. E.g. insert x number of rows and commit. Repeat until all rows are done. Much of the performance is dependant on what triggers and indexes are configured on the table.

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Thank you for replying :) I have a question regarding this solution though. When i was using multiple transactions, most of my code was doing jdbc work. But now the code will do basic java, i.e. formulating the one big INSERT statement using the data extracted from the txt file. So my question is, will i benefit if i go for this approach or will the excess java work(formulation of the big INSERT statement) take as much time as the multiple database transactions? –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:09
    
+1 As you have larger and larger transactions, the benefit reduces. You could get to the point where making it larger is slightly worse. I would start with 100 or 1000 inserts per transaction. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 30 '12 at 17:20
    
All in all, it is 7.5k database transactions + extra java string operations vs. 80k database transactions. What do you have to say about this? which is faster? @PeterLawrey –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:31
    
If you divide the number of transactions by 10, it could be 5x faster at a guess, but it is much easier for you try it and see. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 30 '12 at 17:33

I would suggest you to use bulk insert:

BULK INSERT List FROM 'c:\Txt.txt' WITH (FIELDTERMINATOR = '","')

It's cleaner approach

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Doesn't BULK INSERT take a table lock? Are you sure that's acceptable for Dhruva's application? –  MikeB Dec 30 '12 at 16:58
    
His intention is unclear, if he wants to insert large amount of data from text file to table, above is the cleaner approach –  Pradeep Simha Dec 30 '12 at 16:59
    
Thank you for replying :) I have a question regarding this solution though. When i was using multiple transactions, most of my code was doing jdbc work. But now the code will do basic java, i.e. formulating the one big INSERT statement using the data extracted from the txt file. So my question is, will i benefit if i go for this approach or will the excess java work(formulation of the big INSERT statement) take as much time as the multiple database transactions? –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:06
    
@DhruvaJain my suggestion is instead of formatting big insert statement, format your text file in the column format with delimiter (say ,) and execute above statement using JDBC, that would be best way. –  Pradeep Simha Dec 30 '12 at 17:07
    
Have a look at this argument. Making and executing a 140(which will involve many basic java string operations) columns long INSERT statement 7.5 k times(as there are 7.5k rows) VS. making and executing a single-column INSERT statement 80k times? which would be faster? –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:21

One big transaction will always be faster than 80k transactions.

What make you believe that creation of 80k transactions will be faster ?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for replying :) I have a question regarding this solution though. When i was using multiple transactions, most of my code was doing jdbc work. But now the code will do basic java, i.e. formulating the one big INSERT statement using the data extracted from the txt file. So my question is, will i benefit if i go for this approach or will the excess java work(formulation of the big INSERT statement) take as much time as the multiple database transactions? –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:06
    
Creating the INSERT statement yourself by parsing a text file in java take less than a millisecond (I know Java is not that fast, but it will be always faster than 80k socket transactions) –  benjarobin Dec 30 '12 at 17:09
    
So, you're saying that making a 140(which will involve many basic java string operations) columns long insert statement 7.5 k times(as there are 7.5k rows) is faster than making a single-column INSERT statement 80k times? –  Dhruva Jain Dec 30 '12 at 17:16
    
@DhruvaJain Certainly it is. Do you have any evidence to the contrary? –  EJP Dec 31 '12 at 7:34
    
@DhruvaJain How would 80k one column inserts be equivalent to 7.5K 140 column inserts? The end result is not the same. Also: you are using parametrized queries right and not constructing the insert statement every time? –  Mark Rotteveel Dec 31 '12 at 9:52

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