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I am trying to refactor a mapM_ function call inside a do block in Haskell. I would like to extract the lambda to a (locally) named function to make the code more readable.

My code originally looks like this:

do
  -- ...
  mapM_ (\x -> x + 1) aList

  return aValue

I would like to change it to

do
  -- ...
  mapM_ func aList
    where func x = x + 1

  return aValue

but I am getting a syntax error on the return aValue line. My actual lambda is more complicated :-), but I did try it with this same lambda to make sure it was not an issue in the lambda code.

How can I rewrite this code? Should I use let ... in instead?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There are three similar (but distinct) ways of defining stuff here:

  • You can attach where clauses after certain definitions--mostly equation-style bindings. So you could put one at the end of your function, or after something defined with let or a surrounding where clause.

  • On the other hand, let x = ... in ... is an expression that evaluates to the part after in, which is the only place the stuff after let is visible.

  • Inside a do block, because there's already an implicit nesting of scope (things are visible after they're first defined), you can use just let x = ... alone. This is really the same thing as the previous form--the rest of the do block after the let is effectively the in ... portion.

If you want a local definition that uses something defined within the do block, your only choice is the third (or passing the other value(s) as argument(s)). For an independent helper functions like your example, however, any style works. Here's your example, to demonstrate each:

The first style, where func is visible anywhere in foo, including anything else defined in the where clause:

foo = do ...
         mapM_ func aList
         ...
         return aValue
  where func x = x + 1

The second style, where func is only visible inside the let expression, which in this case is the entire do block:

foo = let func x = x + 1 
      in do 
         ...
         mapM_ func aList
         ...
         return aValue

And the third style, defining it inside the do block. In this case, func is only visible after the let; in the first ... it hasn't been defined yet.

foo = do ...
         let func x = x + 1
         mapM_ func aList
         ...
         return aValue

Oh, and for good measure: Since let ... in ... is an expression, you can also use it anywhere you have an expression, to name some local definitions. So here's another example:

foo = do ...
         let func x = x + 1 in mapM_ func aList
         ...
         return aValue

As before, func is only visible inside the let expression, which in this case is the single expression after it, nowhere else.

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Thanks. The third form looks like it will allow me to define the lambda function close enough to the mapM_ to be useful. I'm only worried that it pollutes the top-level function namespace with the name func defined in the let (minor issue). –  Ralph Dec 30 '12 at 17:49
    
@Ralph: Well, it's just a matter of what scope you want it visible in. If your do block is big enough that you need to worry about polluting the namespace inside it, you should probably consider breaking it into smaller pieces anyway. :] –  C. A. McCann Dec 30 '12 at 17:52
    
Yeah, that had occurred to me too. I'm translating some functional Scala code that some idiot wrote (:-)) with functions that are longer than they should be. –  Ralph Dec 30 '12 at 17:55

Another option is to use forM_ instead of mapM_, which flips the order of the arguments. You can then use the $ operator with a trailing lambda expression like this:

do
  forM_ aList $ \x -> do
    ...

  return aValue
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I had not considered that alternative. I'll look at my code again to see if that is more readable. In other cases where I need a monadic list traversal, but there is no convenient flipped version like forM_, I can just use flip to make a new function. –  Ralph Dec 30 '12 at 17:51

Shouldn't your where be at the end of the function?

Like this:

function aList aValue = do
    mapM_ func aList
    return aValue
    where func x = x + 1
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I'm not sure. I would like to find some way to extract the lambda into a very local function for improved readability. If I have to put it at the end of the top-level function, that makes it much less usable. I'm a Haskell noob. –  Ralph Dec 30 '12 at 17:35

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