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EDIT2

Here is the solution that works for the following problem of giving a QThread exclusively to the object.

I've changed the approach for the problem. I don't want to close QThread in MyClass anymore, cause the following solution seems easier and not too bad looking.

My solution is modification of the solution given here: http://mayaposch.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/how-to-really-truly-use-qthreads-the-full-explanation/

The problem with that solution was that QObject worker wasn't really deleted (checked it).

QThread *myThread = new QThread();
SCIntermediary* myObj = new MyClass();
myObj->moveToThread(myThread);
connect(myThread, SIGNAL(started()), myObj, SLOT(setup()));
connect(myObj, SIGNAL(destroyed()), myThread, SLOT(quit()), Qt::DirectConnection);
connect(myObj, SIGNAL(finished()), myObj, SLOT(deleteLater()));
connect(myThread, SIGNAL(finished()), myThread, SLOT(deleteLater()));
myThread -> start();

// do your work bla bla bla

myObj -> finishIt(); // this function only emits finish() signal of myObj
myThread -> wait();

This is the first solution that worked for me destroying both myObj and myThread without any errors or other troubles at all.

ENDOF EDIT

I'm trying to create a class will do some stuff between my client and my server. I'd like it to have it's own thread. So what I did is:

class Myclass : public QObject {
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    Myclass();
    ~Myclass();

private:
    QThread *my_thread;
    QTcpSocket *sock;
}

Here is how I coded my constructor:

Myclass::Myclass(){
    my_thread = new QThread();
    my_thread -> start();
    moveToThread(my_thread);

    sock = new QTcpSocket(this);
    sock -> connectToHost("host", port);
}

This didn't work. It didn't work, because the code for TcpSocket wasn't executed in the same thread the parent object currently is. So what I decided to do is to create slot and signal for setup and emit it in my constructor. Here is how my code looks right now.

class Myclass : public QObject {
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    Myclass();
    ~Myclass();

public slots:
    void setup();

signals:
    void do_setup();

private:
    QThread *my_thread;
    QTcpSocket *sock;
}

And some of it's implementation

Myclass::Myclass(){
    my_thread = new QThread();
    my_thread -> start();
    moveToThread(my_thread);

    connect(this, SIGNAL(do_setup()), this, SLOT(setup()));
    emit do_setup();
}

void Myclass::setup(){
    sock = new QTcpSocket();
    sock -> connectToHost("host", port);
}

Now it works and here comes the sad part - it looks terrible! It's awful and I have no idea how to make it look better or how such pattern should be done in the first place. What would you advice me to do to get the same effect?

Additionally - I have no idea how to write good destructor for this - how to delete QThread smoothly and all the class objects..

EDIT

For now I believe the solution is quite alright - the only problem left is how to write a destructor for that. I have no idea how it can be done here.

share|improve this question
2  
Yes inherit QThread is no longer recommended, see the Qt documentation –  benjarobin Dec 30 '12 at 19:12
1  
Out of curiosity, if you play with where you put moveToThread(my_thread);, in your original example, would it change anything? say, if you put that statement as last line of your constructor - so you move object with all its children to new thread once it is fully constructed? or, just before connecting socket but after creating it? –  Ilya Kobelevskiy Dec 30 '12 at 19:36
2  
@IlyaKobelevskiy qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/qthread.html : "Detailed Description" and "Notes (bottom of the page)" –  benjarobin Jan 5 '13 at 19:23
1  
For destructor, check out Maya Posch example - mayaposch.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/… Since your thread is not child of MyClass, perhaps you can finish thread as lst thing in destructor and connect finished signal to deleteLater for thread? –  Ilya Kobelevskiy Jan 5 '13 at 20:51
1  
There are examples of how to properly do this without subclassing a QThread. You are supposed to wire your custom slots to the signals emitted by the thread when it starts and stops.... THEN you start the thread. The signals emitted by the thread will call the slots and still be in that thread. Dont do anything else with the object from that main thread. –  jdi Jan 5 '13 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For destructor, check out Maya Posch example: http://mayaposch.wordpress.com/2011/11/01/how-to-really-truly-use-qthreads-the-full-explanation/ Since your thread is not child of MyClass, perhaps you can call finish() on thread as last thing in destructor and connect destroyed() signal of MyClass to deleteLater for thread?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's exactly what I do now - only one correction - you need to make that connection as DirectConnection to call it on the thread you are closing (actually it calls quit, and finished on thread calls it's deleteLater). –  Gricha Jan 6 '13 at 4:03
    
@Gricha The Qt::DirectConnection between myObj->destroyed() and myThread->quit() is only allowed because quit() is thread-safe. You're directly calling a function of myThread from a thread other than myThread->thread() which generally isn't safe. –  Martin Oct 10 '14 at 12:38

Instead of using a signal, you could use QMetaObject::invokeMethod http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/qmetaobject.html#invokeMethod

QMetaObject::invokeMethod(this, "setup", Qt::QueuedConnection);

But this is still heavy, but I guess this is the better option... If anyone have better idea, comment :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I like it - it takes of the signal hack. I agree it is still not the solution but we're closer to it ;) thanks –  Gricha Dec 30 '12 at 19:48

What about this, I think manually moving socket to newly created thread right before connecting it should work, since both objects should be in the same thread which is newly created one?

Myclass::Myclass()
{
    my_thread = new QThread();
    my_thread -> start();
    moveToThread(my_thread);

    sock = new QTcpSocket(this);
    sock -> moveToThread(my_thread);
    sock -> connectToHost("host", port);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It won't work. Let's say you are in thread A now. You are moving this object to thread B. But the method is still in thread A. So you are trying to create a socket in thread A, and as parent you give it something that belongs to thread B. You cannot do that. The error you'll get is: QObject: Cannot create children for a parent that is in a different thread. –  Gricha Jan 1 '13 at 17:20

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