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Another quick question. I have this simple method:

    #region Fields

    private Collection<Address> _addresses;

    #endregion

    #region Public methods

    public Address DeliveryAddress()
    {
        if (_addresses == null)
            if (this.Id > 0)
                _addresses = Core.Data.Addresses.GetClient(this.Id);

        return _addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery);
    }

    public Address InvoiceAddress()
    {
        if (_addresses == null)
            if (this.Id > 0)
                _addresses = Core.Data.Addresses.GetClient(this.Id);

        return _addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Invoice);
    }

    #endregion

As you can see I trying to return one result for a DeliveryAddress and one result for an InvoiceAddress. My problem is that I would like the link expression to create a new instance of Address() if SingleOrDefault returns null. I am really new to linq, so I am not sure whether SingleOrDefault is the correct expression I should be using.

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See: stackoverflow.com/questions/11594355/… –  Kittoes Dec 30 '12 at 18:57
    
You might want to look into the .Any() function. –  Kittoes Dec 30 '12 at 18:58
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You could use DefaultIfEmpty and use that instance as default value:

return _addresses.Where(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery)
                 .DefaultIfEmpty(new Adress())
                 .Single();
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3  
In this case you can also use Single instead of SingleOrDefault –  w0lf Dec 30 '12 at 19:08
    
@w0lf Yes, that would be less confusing. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 30 '12 at 19:11
    
@w0lf: good idea :) –  Tim Schmelter Dec 30 '12 at 19:12
    
excellent, just what I was looking for –  r3plica Dec 30 '12 at 19:37
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Use the null-coalescing operator:

return _addresses
    .SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery) ?? new Address();

The expression

x ?? y

yields x if x is not null, otherwise y. You can chain the operator

x ?? y ?? z ?? t

This returns the first non-null value or null if all of them are null.


UPDATE

Note that SingleOrDefault throws an exception if the sequence has more than one element. If you need the first element of a sequence possibly having no or more than one element, use FirstOrDefault instead.

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You could create your own extension method, like this:

public static T NewIfNull<T>(this T obj) where T: class, new()
{
   return obj ?? new T();
}

... then tack a usage onto the end of SingleOrDefault:

var singleResult = myCollection.SingleOrDefault().NewIfNull();

... or because the logic is so simple, just inline it as other answers have said.

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Instead of

return _addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery);

Do something like this:

var address = _addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery);

if(address == null)
    address = new Address();

return address;
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I'd be inclined to write both of these as extension methods on IEnumerable<Address>. You can use the null-coalesing operator to return a new instance if the SingleOrDefault() call returns null.

public static class AddressExtensions
{
    public static Address DeliveryAddress(this IEnumerable<Address> addresses)
    {
        return addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery) 
               ?? new Address();
    }

    public static Address InvoiceAddress(this IEnumerable<Address> addresses)
    {
        return addresses.SingleOrDefault(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Invoice) 
               ?? new Address();
    }
}
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Apart from alternatives in other answers, you can also create your own SingleOrNew Extension method.

public static TSource SingleOrNew<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate ) where T:new()
{
     return source.SingleOrDefault(predicate) ?? new T();
}

It can be used as

return _addresses.SingleOrNew(x => x.TypeId == AddressType.Delivery);
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