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It's easier to show the code, than talk about it. I also searched the inter-webs for an answer, but could not find any, so here's my code:

http://pastebin.com/M606mXzR

I also added an output, which is on lines 50-70. Output from 61-70 is the "right" one, the one I want.

Am I using fill() method wrong, or what? Can't wrap my head around this...

Is there really a difference?

ClassB[][] classB_2Array = new ClassB[10][10];

Between this:

for (ClassB[] classB_1Array : classB_2Array) {
            Arrays.fill(classB_1Array, new ClassB());
}

to this:

for (int i = 0; i < classB_2Array.length; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < classB_2Array[0].length; j++) {
        classB_2Array[i][j] = new ClassB();
    }
}

Anyways, just check out my code and thank you all for your answers!

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Answer to your question: Yes, there is a difference (see JavaDoc).

Your first version puts one object instance into every single array element of a row. So a change to this instance is visible in every element in the same row of the array. You'll have i ClassB instances in total.

The second version puts its own instance into each array element. You'll have i*j ClassB instances in total.

Your first version of the code is equivalent to

for (ClassB[] classB_1Array : classB_2Array) {
    ClassB instance = new ClassB();
    Arrays.fill(classB_1Array, instance);
}

Hope this information helps you, I did not look at your pastebin code.

EDIT:

To clarify your misunderstanding, closely look at the output of this programm:

import java.util.Arrays;

public class ArrayFiller {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // your first version:
        Person[][] yourFirstVersion = new Person[2][2];
        for (Person[] array : yourFirstVersion) {
            Arrays.fill(array, new Person("Mike"));
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(yourFirstVersion));
        yourFirstVersion[0][1].setName("Paul");
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(yourFirstVersion));
        System.out.println("-----");
        // equivalent: my version:
        Person[][] myVersion = new Person[2][2];
        for (Person[] array : myVersion) {
            Person person = new Person("John");
            Arrays.fill(array, person);
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(myVersion));
        myVersion[0][1].setName("Thomas");
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(myVersion));
        System.out.println("-----");
        // your second version
        Person[][] yourSecondVersion = new Person[2][2];
        for (int i = 0; i < yourSecondVersion.length; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < yourSecondVersion[i].length; j++) {
                yourSecondVersion[i][j] = new Person("Max");
            }
        }
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(yourSecondVersion));
        yourSecondVersion[0][1].setName("Chris");
        System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(yourSecondVersion));
    }

    private static class Person {
        private String name;
        public Person(String name) {
            System.out.println("Constructor called for " + name);
            this.name = name;
        }
        public void setName(String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }
        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return name;
        }
    }
}

Here's the output:

Constructor called for Mike
Constructor called for Mike
[[Mike, Mike], [Mike, Mike]]
[[Paul, Paul], [Mike, Mike]]
-----
Constructor called for John
Constructor called for John
[[John, John], [John, John]]
[[Thomas, Thomas], [John, John]]
-----
Constructor called for Max
Constructor called for Max
Constructor called for Max
Constructor called for Max
[[Max, Max], [Max, Max]]
[[Max, Chris], [Max, Max]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank You so much for your quick answer! "Assigns the specified Object reference to each element of the specified array of Objects." Of course... the "Object reference". I thought I made a "new" object, when new is specified: Arrays.fill(array, new Object); – Furlando Dec 30 '12 at 19:20
    
I un-checked the answer, because I still want to know why Arrays.fill(array, new object()) won't work.. I mean, I specified a new-keyword there, so it should make a new object, not reference something pre-made. – Furlando Dec 30 '12 at 21:44
1  
look at the code example in my answer. new is called once with the method, and the reference returned by the constructor used just like in my code example. The main fact is: new is called only once in your 1st version, as in my code example. – jlordo Dec 30 '12 at 22:14
    
@Furlando look at the example program and output I added to my post. – jlordo Dec 30 '12 at 22:34
1  
Because the purpose of the method is not to behave like expected, it behaves as documented. The method makes sense if you use an immutable type and want to fill an array with default values and change only some indexes later on. – jlordo Dec 31 '12 at 16:55

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