Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to write a Javascript function that magnifies a 2D Javascript array by a given integer scale factor. The width and height of the "magnified" array should be twice the width and height of the original array, as shown in the example below.

function magnifyArray(arr, scaleFactor){
    // magnify arr by the given scale factor
}

var arr1 = [
    [0, 1],
    [1, 0]
]

var arr2 = magnifyArray(arr1, 2);
console.log(arr2);
//arr2 should now be:
//[[0, 0, 1, 1],
//[0, 0, 1, 1],
///[1, 1, 0, 0],
//[1, 1, 0, 0]
//]
share|improve this question
    
What's exactly the problem ? –  Denys Séguret Dec 30 '12 at 20:12
1  
What do you mean by magnify? –  0x499602D2 Dec 30 '12 at 20:12
    
Specifically, I want to do this because I'm creating a Javascript fractal generator, but that's probably not the only use case of this algorithm. –  Anderson Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:12
    
@David See the example - I thought it was clear from the example I gave. –  Anderson Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:13
    
@Anderson: Does it have to handle other factors than positive integers? –  Matti Virkkunen Dec 30 '12 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This recursive approach will work for arrays with any number of dimensions:

function mag(arr, scale) {
    var res = [];
    if(!arr.length)
        return arr;
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        var temp = mag(arr[i], scale);
        for (var k = 0; k < scale; k++) {
            res.push(temp.slice ? temp.slice(0) : temp);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

For not-arrays it will return the object itself.

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Q2T4J/4/

[EDIT]: added .slice(0) to copy array elements to new array object (this maybe is not necessary for your scenario)

share|improve this answer
    
It would be useful to post this on jsfiddle (for testing and debugging purposes). I can't wait to try it out. :) –  Anderson Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:38
    
Added link to jsfiddle –  SergeyS Dec 30 '12 at 20:46

For an array of arrays of simple values, magnifyArray will produce your example result.

function replicateEntries( a , x ) {
    var i, j, result = new Array();
    for ( i = 0 ; i < a.length ; ++i ) {
        for ( j = 0 ; j < x ; ++j ) result.push( a[i] );
    }
    return result;
}

function magnifyArray( a , x ) {
    var i, rows = new Array();
    for ( i = 0 ; i < a.length ; ++i ) {
        rows.push( replicateEntries( a[i] , x ) );
    }
    return replicateEntries( rows , x );
}
share|improve this answer

oh, the ugly

function mag(matrix, scale) {
    var rows = matrix.length, cols = matrix[0].length;
    var mat = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        var row = [];
        for (var j = 0; j < cols; j++) {
            for (var k = 0; k < scale; k++) {
                row.push(matrix[i][j]);
            }
        }
        for (var k = 0; k < scale; k++) {
            mat.push(row);
            // or use mat.push(row.slice(0)); to clone duplicate rows
        }
    }
    return mat;
}

note that i don't clone the array objects when i duplicate the rows. this could lead to unexpected results if you modify a row later, but its an efficiency gain otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Will this only work for 2-dimensional arrays, or will it work for arrays of any dimension? –  Anderson Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:24
    
@AndersonGreen 2d array only. –  goat Dec 30 '12 at 20:25
1  
See my answer for any-dimension arrays. –  SergeyS Dec 30 '12 at 20:34

You'll have to do it the hard and boring way as there is nothing included.

For example :

var a =
[
[0, 1],
[1, 0]
];
var scale = 2;
​var b =​ [];
for (var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
    var bi = [];
    var ai = a[i];
    for (var j=0; j<ai.length; j++) {
        for (var k=0; k<scale; k++)  bi.push(ai[j]);
    }
    for (var k=0; k<scale; k++)b.push(bi);
}​
share|improve this answer
1  
Do we really have to write everything ? I edited to adapt it to any scale... But I'd really like to know why this answer was downvoted. –  Denys Séguret Dec 30 '12 at 20:19
1  
Be aware that by pushing the same array multiple times they will be the same array instance, and changing the value in one cell in your matrix will change values in other cells as well. –  Matti Virkkunen Dec 30 '12 at 20:20
    
@dystroy The solution is much more comprehensive than it was before - hopefully all the downvotes will be removed eventually. –  Anderson Green Dec 30 '12 at 20:21
1  
@MattiVirkkunen Yes. This could be changed but I see it as an optimization (now that you pointed it, as I didn't think about it before). –  Denys Séguret Dec 30 '12 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.