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What I am trying to create is a data structure for a logic gate simulator I am writing. Below is a generalized version of how I have written my structure:

public class Node
{
   private Node input1 = new Node();
   private Node input2 = new Node();

   public Node()
   {}
}

When an instance of Node is created it causes a stack overflow, which I later saw is due to an infinite loop. But, my question is, how do you go about defining such a data structure?

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6  
So you create an instance of Node. Which creates two instances of Node. Each of which creates two instances of Node. Which creates... KABOOM! –  Hans Passant Dec 30 '12 at 20:59
    
If you tell us what you want to do. Surely we can help. –  Janes Abou Chleih Dec 30 '12 at 21:01
    
Sorry, what I am asking is how can I have this sort of structure, without infinite recursion occurring. –  i_am_the_man Dec 30 '12 at 21:03

3 Answers 3

This is rather a case of infinite recursion than an infinite loop. What you have is a node that contains a node that contains a node... ad infinitum. Don't initialize those fields to new objects. You will likely want to leave them uninitialized and assign values to them later.

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You could pass two instances to the constructor which saves them to the local attributes. Then you have encapsulated nodes without producing a stack overflow. –  Marco Klein Dec 30 '12 at 21:01
    
@Marco: That's indeed handy for many cases. Many interesting logic gate configurations do require loops in the graph though, so you will need setters too in order to create them. –  Matti Virkkunen Dec 30 '12 at 21:04

You should remodelNode class like following to allow null values for input1/input2.

public class Node
{
   private Node input1 = default(Node);
   private Node input2 = default(Node);

   public Node()
   {}

   public Node(Node node1, Node node2)
   {
      input1 = node1;
      input2 = node2;
   } 
}
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default(Node) is just an obfuscated way of writing null, and fields are initialized to their default values by default anyways. –  Matti Virkkunen Dec 30 '12 at 21:12

When you declare a Node here it causes infinite recursion. All the nodes you're infinitely allocating are going on the stack, thus the stack overflow. Instead you should change your definition to;

 public class Node
 {
     private Node input1;
     private Node input2;

     public Node()
     {}

      //then add a new method to actually allocate those nodes
      init()
      {
          input1 = new Node();
          input2 = new Node();
      }
 }

Now you can do

     Node mNode = new Node();
     mNode.init();
     mNode.input1.init();

Or whatever without getting an overflow. Basically you just need to control that allocation.

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