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My teacher gave me the next task:

On a sorted array, find the number of occurrences of a number.
The complexity of the algorithm must be as small as possible.

This is what I have thought of:

public static int count(int[] a, int x)
{
    int low = 0, high = a.length - 1;

    while( low <= high )
    {
        int middle = low + (high - low) / 2;

        if( a[middle] > x ) {
            // Continue searching the lower part of the array
            high = middle - 1;
        } else if( a[middle] < x ) {
            // Continue searching the upper part of the array
            low = middle + 1;
        } else {
            // We've found the array index of the value
            return x + SearchLeft(arr, x, middle) + SearchRight(arr, x, middle);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

SearchLeft and SearchRight iterate the array, until the number doesn't show.

I'm not sure if I have achieved writing the faster code for this problem, and I would like see other opinions.

Edit: After some help from comments and answers, this is my current attempt:

public static int count(int[] array, int value)
{
    return SearchRightBound(array, value) - SearchLeftBound(array, value);
}

public static int SearchLeftBound(int[] array, int value)
{
    int low = 0, high = array.length - 1;

    while( low < high )
    {
        int middle = low + (high - low) / 2;

        if(array[middle] < value) {
            low = middle + 1;
        }
        else {
            high = middle;
        }
    }

    return low;
}

public static int SearchRightBound(int[] array, int value)
{
    int low = 0, high = array.length - 1;

    while( low < high )
    {
        int middle = low + (high - low) / 2;

        if(array[middle] > value) {
            high = middle;
        }
        else {
            low = middle + 1;
        }
    }

    return low;
}
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1  
1  
Basically, yes. There are two problems I see, a) you have to add 1 in the case the target occurs at all, b) you get a negative return value if the target doesn't occur. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 30 '12 at 22:07
    
dont use the homework tag it is deprecated –  Woot4Moo Dec 31 '12 at 16:39
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

SearchLeft and SearchRight iterate the array, until the number doesn't show.

That means if the entire array is filled with the target value, your algorithm is O(n).

You can make it O(log n) worst case if you binary-search for the first and for the last occurrence of x.

// search first occurrence
int low = 0, high = a.length - 1;
while(low < high) {
    int middle = low + (high-low)/2;
    if (a[middle] < x) {
        // the first occurrence must come after index middle, if any
        low = middle+1;
    } else if (a[middle] > x) {
        // the first occurrence must come before index middle if at all
        high = middle-1;
    } else {
        // found an occurrence, it may be the first or not
        high = middle;
    }
}
if (high < low || a[low] != x) {
    // that means no occurrence
    return 0;
}
// remember first occurrence
int first = low;
// search last occurrence, must be between low and a.length-1 inclusive
high = a.length - 1;
// now, we always have a[low] == x and high is the index of the last occurrence or later
while(low < high) {
    // bias middle towards high now
    int middle = low + (high+1-low)/2;
    if (a[middle] > x) {
        // the last occurrence must come before index middle
        high = middle-1;
    } else {
        // last known occurrence
        low = middle;
    }
}
// high is now index of last occurrence
return (high - first + 1);
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How can I search the first and last occurrence? –  Tyymo Dec 30 '12 at 21:44
    
A small modification of your binary search code. You don't stop when array[middle].data == x, but set either low or high to middle then (which depends on whether you want the first or last occurrence). (And the loop condition would be low < high.) –  Daniel Fischer Dec 30 '12 at 21:47
    
How could that be faster? Once you find one of the occurrences, isn't a search useless since other occurrences are right there? –  effeffe Dec 30 '12 at 21:59
    
@effeffe The count of occurrences shall be returned. If there are many, it is faster to binary-search for the last occurrence than to count them. Try it out with an array of 1000 million 0s, counting the occurrences of 0. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 30 '12 at 22:02
1  
@effeffe I suspect the 1 ? (int*)0 : (void*)1 drained your caffeine reservoir. (Good job there, by the way.) –  Daniel Fischer Dec 30 '12 at 22:38
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Well this is essentially binary search + walking towards the boundaries of the solution interval. The only way you could possibly speed this is up is maybe cache the last values of low and high and then use binary search to find the boarders as well, but this will really only matter for very large intervals in which case it's unlikely that you jumped right into it.

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