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How can I create a pseudo-randomized integer that is constantly changing? This way, I could enter:

cout << randomInt << endl;
cout << randomInt << endl;
cout << randomInt << endl;

and the program would return something like:

45.7
564.89
1.64

(I'm not sure if any of this makes any sense.)

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It's possible to do what you want, but I don't think is a good idea. Change of state should be explicit... –  K-ballo Dec 30 '12 at 21:43
14  
Those don't look like integers. –  JasonD Dec 30 '12 at 21:44
4  
You could define randomInt, or preferably RANDOM_INT, as a macro that expands to call to a function that returns random numbers -- but your code would be much clearer if you just called the function directly. Why do you want to make it look like an object's value is changing? –  Keith Thompson Dec 30 '12 at 21:45
    
@JasonD - Eagle's eye! –  SChepurin Dec 30 '12 at 22:21

5 Answers 5

Create a class representing the Random number:

class Random {
};

Then overload operator<<:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const Random& random) {
    return os << generate_random();
}

Use as:

int main() {
    Random random;
    std::cout << random; 
    std::cout << random; 
    std::cout << random; 
    return 0;
}

Obviously, you need to implement generate_random.

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1  
Small generic example how to overload the << operator to output into streams: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1z2f6c2k%28v=vs.80%29.aspx –  Kay Dec 30 '12 at 21:52
2  
Maybe it would be better to just implement the conversion operator to int? –  K-ballo Dec 30 '12 at 21:53

Using the new C++11 pseudo-random number generation classes:

#include <random>
#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    std::random_device rd;
    std::mt19937 gen(rd());
    std::uniform_int_distribution<> dis(1, 6);
    for(int n=0; n<10; ++n)
        std::cout << dis(gen) << ' ';
    std::cout << '\n';
}

The above simulates ten dice rolls.

If you want floating-point values instead of integers, use std::uniform_real_distribution instead of std::uniform_int_distribution.

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This is exactly what std::rand is for:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{    
    std::srand(static_cast<unsigned>(std::time(0))); // seed

    for (int i = 5; i--;) std::cout << std::rand() % 5 << '\n';

    // Output are random integers
}

Demo

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5  
If I understand correctly, the OP intention is to make the rand() calls implicit –  K-ballo Dec 30 '12 at 21:46
    
Why is the static_cast needed? time_t is an arithmetic type; it will be implicitly converted to the parameter type unsigned. –  Keith Thompson Dec 30 '12 at 21:46
1  
@K-ballo: If I understand correctly, the OP's intention is a bad idea. Waiting for clarification. –  Keith Thompson Dec 30 '12 at 21:47
    
@Keith Thompson: Yeap, yes it is... That was my first comment to his question –  K-ballo Dec 30 '12 at 21:48

Make a class with a single implicit conversion

class t { operator int() { return 42; } };

int main()
{
    t test; std::cout << t <<'\n';
    return test;
}

and of course whatever other members you want, just no other conversion operators.

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This will not play well with other random code...

#include <ctime>
#include <cstdlib>

struct RandomInt {
  RandomInt() {
    static bool initialized = (srand(std::time(0)), true);
  }
  operator int() {
    return std::rand();
  }
};
#include <iostream>
std::ostream& operator<<( std::ostream& stream, RandomInt x ) {
  return stream << static_cast<int>(x);
}


int main() {
  RandomInt randomInt;
  std::cout << randomInt << "\n";
  std::cout << randomInt << "\n";
  std::cout << randomInt << "\n";
}

this is pretty much a bad idea.

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