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I have some collision detection involving lines of arbitrary angles that I can't know ahead of time. I've set up my code to treat them as the form y = mx + b and whenever I create a horizontal line all of the fields come out as NaN. My question is: What operations in AS3 can cause NaN to be returned. The thing that comes to mind is that a perfectly vertical line will have a slope of Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY and I imagine that that could cause potential errors. It shouldn't be on a horizontal line, but logic problems happen. The point is, what causes NaN to be returned in AS3?

package {

    import flash.display.Sprite

    public class Line extends Sprite{

        var x1:Number, x2:Number, y1:Number, y2:Number;
        var m:Number, b:Number; //y = mx + b

    public function Line(x1C:Number, y1C:Number, x2C:Number, y2C:Number){
            x1 = x1C;
            x2 = x2C;
            y1 = y1C;
            y2 = y2C;
            if(x2 - x1 == 0)
                m = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
            else if(y2 - y1 == 0)
                m = 0;
            else
                m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1); //these calculations could be off....
            b = y1 - (m * x1);
            this.graphics.moveTo(x1, y1);
        }

    }

}
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Q: "Whenever I create a horizontal line all of the fields come out as NaN". Hmmm - that sounds suspiciously like divide by zero, doesn't it? Q: Can you show us some code???? ALSO: look at this link: stackoverflow.com/questions/12123047/… –  paulsm4 Dec 30 '12 at 22:42
    
Whenever you declare a Number variable the default value will be NaN, but it is probably not the case here –  Zan Kusterle Dec 30 '12 at 22:44
    
package { import flash.display.Sprite public class Line extends Sprite{ var x1:Number, x2:Number, y1:Number, y2:Number; var m:Number, b:Number; //y = mx + b public function Line(x1C:Number, y1C:Number, x2C:Number, y2C:Number){ x1 = x1C; x2 = x2C; y1 = y1C; y2 = y2C; if(x2 - x1 == 0) m = Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY; else if(y2 - y1 == 0) m = 0; else m = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1); //these calculations could be off.... b = y1 - (m * x1); this.graphics.moveTo(x1, y1); } } } –  avorum Dec 30 '12 at 22:48
    
There's code for the Line class, formats weird...hmm... –  avorum Dec 30 '12 at 22:48
2  
You should edit the question and put the code there –  kapep Dec 30 '12 at 22:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  • Your code may produce a NaN right here:

    b = y1 - (m * x1);
    

if m is an infinity, and x1 is 0, then multiplying it should result in NaN and this is true not only for AS3.

  • I would recommend you to never use a line equation in a slope-intercept form, that you're using (y = Ax + B), cause you cannot define a vertical line this way. Always use a general form: Ax + By + C = 0.

  • Do not compare floats with ==, always compare floating-point numbers with epsilon. might help. You can have problems in your code if x2 is almost equal to x1.

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I have been having trouble with the scenario involving your final point, could I get you to elaborate on the reasoning for that assertion? (for when x2 is almost equal to x1) –  avorum Dec 30 '12 at 23:39
    
You mention comparing floats with ==, my coordinates for the lines are acquired using mouseX and mouseY, would using int instead be an option? For reference I'm using the mouse to draw lines. –  avorum Dec 31 '12 at 0:05
    
Using int would be an option, if AS3 guarantees the mouse coordinates to be integers. I do not quite understand what exactly you want me to elaborate on.. The main point is that comparing floating-points with == is not good, even in some "obvious" cases. For example, sin(1.2) is not always equal (==) to sin(1.2), though their values may differ by 1e-16.... Can't find a proof for this. =\ –  Ixanezis Jan 1 '13 at 20:27
    
Thanks, that helps alot. Thanks again to everyone who helped me find this problem. –  avorum Jan 2 '13 at 1:49
    
that very proof I was talking about. –  Ixanezis Jan 2 '13 at 11:16

If you declare a Number and don't assign a value, it will be NaN.

for example :

var speed:Number;
trace(speed); // NaN

unlike and int which defaults to 0;

var speed:int;
trace(speed); // 0
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The documentation of the global isNan() function gives some examples:

  • 0 divided by 0: 0/0
  • Square root of a negative number: Math.sqrt(-1)
  • Arcsine of number greater than 1 or less than 0: Math.asin(2)
  • String that cannot be converted to Number "5a": [when parsing it]

Also 1 * someObject or 1 + someUndefinedNumber will evaluate to NaN

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1  
This is just a list of most common invalid operations in AS3 documentation. There are more in IEEE 754 floating-point arithmetic standart, such as 0 * infinity, infinity - infinity when signs agree, REMAINDER(Anything, 0.0) and a few others. –  Ixanezis Dec 30 '12 at 23:24

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