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I have a weird problem. The program below is supposed to checks user's input and echoes it on the screen, unless the input is some kind of "commands" I have defined in "if" statements like the /h or /r or /x. IF statement will treat the string as a single item and not as several separate strings. So when I input something with a delimiter like Comma (,) Semicolon (;) Equals (=) Space ( ) Tab ( ) Quote (") it will search for a second item, thus throws an error and exits. That's my problem. Please test this program if you can't understand me. I want somehow to make checks for those "commands" first, before the input is echoed. Please enlighten me! :/ Thanks.

@echo off

:again
set /p input= ^> 

if /i {%input%}=={/h} (
cls
echo /h
echo /r
echo /x
goto again
)

if /i {%input%}=={/r} (
cls
type blablafile.txt
goto again
)

if /i {%input%}=={/x} (
exit
)

echo %input%
goto again
share|improve this question
1  
"it won't work" how exactly? Ie. what happens, and how is it different from what should happen? (Preferably edit the question instead of explaining in comments.) –  hyde Dec 30 '12 at 23:17
    
Your edit doesn't help. Repeating "it doesn't work" again doesn't tell us what isn't working. Please edit again, tell us exactly what "doesn't work" means, and provide some sample input that "doesn't work". –  Ken White Dec 31 '12 at 0:21
    
You are both right. Sorry. I've searched more and understood something more about the "if" command and realised the root of the problem. I have updated original post. –  Leajian Dec 31 '12 at 0:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The IF statement has the general form of IF Value1 CompareOperator Value2 COMMAND

The line has to be parsed into the various components before the IF is actually executed. There are many scenarios that can lead to invalid syntax.

Some obvious ones are special characters like &, |, <, >: These must be escaped like ^& or quoted like "&".

Not as obvious a problem are token delimiters like <space>, <tab>, ;, ,, and =. These also must be escaped or quoted. Take for example a line from your program with <space> as the user input. After expansion of `%input%, the line looks

if /i { }=={/h} (

The parser terminates Value1 at the 1st unescaped/unquoted token delimiter, so it thinks Value1 is { and it thinks that } is part of the CompareOperator. That yields a syntax error.

Another problem is a value with an odd number of quotes, such as your user input example of ".

if /i {"}=={/h} (

Quotes are a state machine. Once quoting is enabled, the parser thinks all characters up until the next quote are part of the same string. So the parser thinks Value1 is {"}=={/h} (, and the command is incomplete - another syntax error.

Partial Solution

You could do something like

if /i "%input%"=="/h" ...

and it will work with input like ; or <space>, or =, etc.

But there are still lots of inputs that will fail. For example: ", "&".

Full Solution

The only sure way to do the test is to enable delayed expansion and use !input! instead of %input%. This works because the parser detects the various components of the IF statement before delayed expansion takes place.

if /i !input!==/h (

The parser identifies Value1 to be !input!, then just before execution, the value is expanded into the user input. At this point there is no more parsing to be done - the IF statement "knows" the entire expanded value is the value to be compared.

Here is a complete working version of your code with the delayed expansion fix:

@echo off
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion

:again
set /p input= ^>

if /i !input!==/h (
cls
echo /h
echo /r
echo /x
goto again
)

if /i !input!==/r (
cls
echo type blablafile.txt
goto again
)

if /i !input!==/x (
exit /b
)

echo !input!
share|improve this answer
    
But, what if I want to echo the variable !input! into a file? Like echo !input!>>inputs.txt. It fails. It just outputs the text !input! into inputs.txt. –  Leajian Dec 31 '12 at 15:14
    
@Leajian - That should work. Are you sure you enabled delayed expansion? –  dbenham Dec 31 '12 at 15:23
    
Just forget my above comment... But, what's the difference between !input! and %input% ? I ask because in my full program I have both !var_name! and %var_name% variables. And the program get's confused when delayed expansion is enabled. –  Leajian Dec 31 '12 at 15:37
    
@Leajian - Type HELP SET or SET /? from a command prompt and begin reading about halfway down at the paragraph that begins "Finally, support for delayed environment variable expansion has been added..." –  dbenham Dec 31 '12 at 15:46

Try changing all the curly braces to double quotes. That fixes the delimiter issue you mentioned for some simple cases, such as a space in the input string. For example,

if /i {%input%}=={/h}

can be changed to

if /i "%input%"=="/h"

Note that this does not handle some other cases, such as a double-quote in the input string. See the other answer for a solution to this.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not solve the problem of a single quote " as input, as was reported in the original question. See my answer for an explanation, as well as a fool proof solution. –  dbenham Dec 31 '12 at 14:32
    
@dbenham thanks, I have edited my answer with a note regarding the double-quote issue you mentioned. BTW could the person who downvoted please explain their concern (hopefully I have addressed it with this edit)? –  808sound Jan 5 '13 at 16:52
    
I think a down vote is harsh and uncalled for. Just so you know, it was not me. –  dbenham Jan 5 '13 at 17:15
    
Thanks @dbenham! –  808sound Jan 5 '13 at 17:19

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