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I'm using visual studio for windows phone and my code for the XML reader does not work when there is attributes in the parent of the XML data.

My C# code

namespace youtube_xml
{
  public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage
  {
    // Constructor
    public MainPage()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        SupportedOrientations = SupportedPageOrientation.PortraitOrLandscape;
    }
    private void listBox1_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var element = XElement.Load("Authors.xml");
        var authors =
        from var in element.Descendants("feed")
        select new Authors
        {
            AuthorName = var.Attribute("scheme").Value,
        };

        listBoxAuthors.DataContext = authors;
    }
    public ImageSource GetImage(string path)
    {
        return new BitmapImage(new Uri(path, UriKind.Relative));
    } 
  }
}

The Working XML data

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<feed>
  <category scheme='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005#kind'/>
</feed>

NOT working data (note: the attribute "xmlns" in the root element "feed")

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<feed xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom' >
  <category scheme='http://schemas.google.com/g/2005#kind'/>
</feed>
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I've updated title to hopefully better reflect your problem (feel free to revert/edit). Also next time please try the same code on regular desktop version to avoid adding extra tags (like windows-phone-7) that may confuse peoply who try to answer. –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 30 '12 at 23:56

1 Answer 1

Welcome to the world of XML namespaces! The problem isn't the fact that "there's an attribute" - it's the fact that it's causing everything below it to be in a namespace. You can no longer say .Attribute("scheme") because that only looks for things in the empty namespace. Namespaces are used via a contraption based on operator overloading:

XNamespace atom = "http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom'";

// And now you can say:

.Descendants(atom + "feed")
.Attribute(atom + "scheme")

Et cetera. The ability to assign a string into an XNamespace variable is thanks to an implicit conversion operator. The + here actually constructs an XName (which, by the way, also has an implicit conversion from string - that's why you plain .Elements("feed") works even though the parameter type is not string)

Handy tip: You can cast an attribute into certain types instead of using .Value, for instance (string)foo.Attribute(atom + "scheme"). It also works with a bunch of other types, for instance int.

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