Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to read an xml file on from an android app using XOM as the XML library. I'm trying this:

Builder parser = new Builder();
Document doc = parser.build(context.openFileInput(XML_FILE_LOCATION));

But I'm getting nu.xom.ParsingException: Premature end of file. even when the file is empty.

I need to parse a very simple XML file, and I'm ready to use another library instead of XOM so let me know if there's a better one. or just a solution to the problem using XOM.

In case it helps, I'm using xerces to get the parser.

------Edit-----

PS: The purpose of this wasn't to parse an empty file, the file just happened to be empty on the first run which showed this error.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the data in the XML file? Seems like you are missing at least on close tag </tag>. – Sam Dec 30 '12 at 23:59
    
@sam the file is empty – Agent1891 Dec 31 '12 at 0:04
1  
(Sorry, I tend to focus on the code more than the verbal descriptions.) Parsing an empty file seems silly. Perhaps you should check the file's size before trying to parse it. – Sam Dec 31 '12 at 0:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you follow this post to the end, it seems that this has to do with xerces and the fact that its an empty file, and they didn't reach a solution on xerces side.

So I handled the issue as follows:

Document doc = null;
try {
    Builder parser = new Builder();
    doc = parser.build(context.openFileInput(XML_FILE_LOCATION));
}catch (ParsingException ex) { //other catch blocks are required for other exceptions.
   //fails to open the file with a parsing error.
   //I create a new root element and a new document.
   //I fill them with xml data (else where in the code) and save them.
    Element root = new Element("root");
    doc = new Document(root);       
}

And then I can do whatever I want with doc. and you can add extra checks to make sure that the cause is really an empty file (like check the file size as indicated by one of sam's comments on the question).

share|improve this answer
    
Rather than catching an exception (I'm sure other scenarios might also throw a ParsingException), I wonder if it wouldn't be less ugly to somehow check if the xml file isn't 'empty'. Perhaps you can check the size() of the underlying FileChannel, or available() bytes from the FileInputStream? – MH. Dec 31 '12 at 1:04
    
@MH. yea ... i said that after the code part. – Agent1891 Dec 31 '12 at 1:40
    
Whups, not sure how I overlooked that. :/ Just wanted to make sure you were aware of a slightly more 'clean' approach. – MH. Dec 31 '12 at 1:52
    
yea .. srry, I didn't have time to write the clean approach, it was 3 am here & I didn't want to leave the question unanswered. – Agent1891 Dec 31 '12 at 11:07

An empty file is not a well-formed XML document. Throwing a ParsingException is the right thing to do here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.