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I'm using NLTK to analyze a few classic texts and I'm running in to trouble tokenizing the text by sentence. For example, here's what I get for a snippet from Moby Dick:

import nltk
sent_tokenize = nltk.data.load('tokenizers/punkt/english.pickle')

'''
(Chapter 16)
A clam for supper? a cold clam; is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?" says I, "but
that's a rather cold and clammy reception in the winter time, ain't it, Mrs. Hussey?"
'''
sample = 'A clam for supper? a cold clam; is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?" says I, "but that\'s a rather cold and clammy reception in the winter time, ain\'t it, Mrs. Hussey?"'

print "\n-----\n".join(sent_tokenize.tokenize(sample))
'''
OUTPUT
"A clam for supper?
-----
a cold clam; is THAT what you mean, Mrs.
-----
Hussey?
-----
" says I, "but that\'s a rather cold and clammy reception in the winter time, ain\'t it, Mrs.
-----
Hussey?
-----
"
'''

I don't expect perfection here, considering that Melville's syntax is a bit dated, but NLTK ought to be able to handle terminal double quotes and titles like "Mrs." Since the tokenizer is the result of an unsupervised training algo, however, I can't figure out how to tinker with it.

Anyone have recommendations for a better sentence tokenizer? I'd prefer a simple heuristic that I can hack rather than having to train my own parser.

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You need to supply a list of abbreviations to the tokenizer, like so:

from nltk.tokenize.punkt import PunktSentenceTokenizer, PunktParameters
punkt_param = PunktParameters()
punkt_param.abbrev_types = set(['dr', 'vs', 'mr', 'mrs', 'prof', 'inc'])
sentence_splitter = PunktSentenceTokenizer(punkt_param)
text = "is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?"
sentences = sentence_splitter.tokenize(text)

sentences is now:

['is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?']

Update: This does not work if the last word of the sentence has an apostrophe or a quotation mark attached to it (like Hussey?'). So a quick-and-dirty way around this is to put spaces in front of apostrophes and quotes that follow sentence-end symbols (.!?):

text = text.replace('?"', '? "').replace('!"', '! "').replace('."', '. "')
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Ah, good to know. Strangely, this does not work if I run the complete sentence in my question through your solution. Any idea why? –  Chris Wilson Dec 31 '12 at 16:21
    
Just added some more info into the answer. –  vpekar Jan 1 '13 at 10:05
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You can tell the PunktSentenceTokenizer.tokenize method to include "terminal" double quotes with the rest of the sentence by setting the realign_boundaries parameter to True. See the code below for an example.

I do not know a clean way to prevent text like Mrs. Hussey from being split into two sentences. However, here is a hack which

  • mangles all occurrences of Mrs. Hussey to Mrs._Hussey,
  • then splits the text into sentences with sent_tokenize.tokenize,
  • then for each sentence, unmangles Mrs._Hussey back to Mrs. Hussey

I wish I knew a better way, but this might work in a pinch.


import nltk
import re
import functools

mangle = functools.partial(re.sub, r'([MD]rs?[.]) ([A-Z])', r'\1_\2')
unmangle = functools.partial(re.sub, r'([MD]rs?[.])_([A-Z])', r'\1 \2')

sent_tokenize = nltk.data.load('tokenizers/punkt/english.pickle')

sample = '''"A clam for supper? a cold clam; is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?" says I, "but that\'s a rather cold and clammy reception in the winter time, ain\'t it, Mrs. Hussey?"'''    

sample = mangle(sample)
sentences = [unmangle(sent) for sent in sent_tokenize.tokenize(
    sample, realign_boundaries = True)]    

print u"\n-----\n".join(sentences)

yields

"A clam for supper?
-----
a cold clam; is THAT what you mean, Mrs. Hussey?"
-----
says I, "but that's a rather cold and clammy reception in the winter time, ain't it, Mrs. Hussey?"
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Just what I needed -- thank you! –  Chris Wilson Dec 31 '12 at 13:06
    
Update: Consolidated part of this answer with the one above –  Chris Wilson Jan 1 '13 at 18:05
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