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I have created a simplified version of my fluid layout here: http://jsfiddle.net/persianturtle/8UZjz/5/ and I am trying to figure out why the right column does not line up exactly with the header above it. There is zero padding. The borders are the same. I must be missing something but I can't for the life of me figure out what is causing the displacement.

To be clear: I am not looking to make the space between the three columns even. They would be even if the right column would line up at the right edge of the screen like the header above it.

The html code is as follows:

 <div id="pagewidth">

<div class="twocols">
  <div class="box content">
  <ul>
   <li>two</li>
   <li>two</li>
   <li>two</li>
   <li>two</li>
   <li>two</li>
   <li>two</li>
  </ul>
  </div>  <!--Closes Content-->


<div class="box rightcol">
<ul>
   <li>three</li>
   <li>three</li>
   <li>three</li>
   <li>three</li>
   <li>three</li>
   <li>three</li>
 </ul>
 </div>   <!--Closes rightcol-->
 </div>   <!--Closes twocols-->

 <div class="box leftcol">
 <ul>
   <li>one</li>
   <li>one</li>
   <li>one</li>
   <li>one</li>
   <li>one</li>
   <li>one</li>
 </ul>
 </div>   <!--Closes leftcol-->

And the CSS:

body{
    background-color:#e8f1c4;  
}

header{
    height:245px;
    width:100%;
}

#pagewidth{
    position:relative;
    margin:0 auto;
    width:95%;  
    min-width:980px;
    max-width:1450px;
}

.box{
    background:#ffffff;
    border:2px solid #bcd78d;
    border-radius:15px;
    -moz-border-radius:15px; /* Old Firefox */
    -webkit-border-radius: 15px;
    margin-top:5px;
}

.leftcol{
    width:24.5%; 
    float:left; 
    position:relative;
}

.twocols{
    width:74.5%; 
    float:right; 
    position:relative;
}

.rightcol{
    width:31.65772%; 
    float:right; 
    position:relative; 
}

.content{  
    float:left; 
    display:inline; 
    position:relative; 
    width:67%; 
}
share|improve this question
    
Hmm...i don't see an issue in Chrome 23...could you please post a picture of the problem or clarify what the issue is? –  Bagavatu Dec 31 '12 at 0:43
1  
It is very subtle.. maybe two or three pixels. Look at the right side. The right side of the header box does not line up exactly with the right column div. I'll post a picture. –  Raphael Rafatpanah Dec 31 '12 at 0:45
1  
Seems it's a problem with the border of the header. If you remove class="box" and just give it a red background, they line up. If you give it a 5px border, it increases the overall width of the header, but only on the right side. –  sooper Dec 31 '12 at 0:46
    
Ah I see it. I was thinking about vertical alignment for some reason. –  Bagavatu Dec 31 '12 at 0:46
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The borders aren't the same. Your header is 100% wide with borders. The other containers are within a container that isn't bordered. The box-sizing property can help you out here:

http://jsfiddle.net/8UZjz/12/

.box{
    background:#ffffff;
    border:2px solid #bcd78d;
    border-radius:15px;
    -moz-border-radius:15px; /* Old Firefox */
    -webkit-border-radius: 15px;
    margin-top:5px;
    box-sizing: border-box; /* needs prefixes for webkit/moz */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it looks great. But, I don't fully understand it just yet. I will play around with it to fully understand it, but every header and div is applied with the same class box and they are all contained within the pagewidth ID. What is the difference? I think I understand what you are saying, however. The header has the border applied outside the 100% size and the other divs have the border applied inside the 100% size? –  Raphael Rafatpanah Dec 31 '12 at 1:00
    
Box-sizing changes the box model. Normally, saying width: 100% would mean "make the content as wide as the container element plus the widths of the borders/margins/paddings". Changing it to border-box removes the borders and the paddings from the calculation. Some people like to put it on every element because it makes the calculation of the element's size a little more natural (see: paulirish.com/2012/box-sizing-border-box-ftw). –  cimmanon Dec 31 '12 at 1:21
    
Thank you very much! –  Raphael Rafatpanah Dec 31 '12 at 1:43
    
Hey, I got some reputation and I upvoted you on this! Thanks again! –  Raphael Rafatpanah Feb 10 '13 at 12:55
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The problem lies with the border of the header, it increases the overall width of the header, but only on the right side. You could try wrapping the header with a div and apply the box class: (jsfiddle)

 <div class="box">
     <header>
     </header>
 </div>
share|improve this answer
    
The strange thing is that the box class is applied to each div and header equally. The header tag was supposed to replace <div id="header> right? So why would it be treated differently? –  Raphael Rafatpanah Dec 31 '12 at 0:53
    
cimmanon provides a better explanation in his solution. –  sooper Dec 31 '12 at 0:56
    
Thank you very much for your help. –  Raphael Rafatpanah Dec 31 '12 at 1:02
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