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I have a big paragraph of text that is divided into subparagraphs with <br>'s:

<p>
  Blah blah blah.
  <br/>
  Blah blah blah. Blah blah blah. Blah blah blah.
  <br/>
  Blah blah blah.
</p>

I want to widen the gap between these subparagraphs, like there is two <br>'s or something like that. I know that the right way to do this is to use <p></p>, but right now I cannot change this layout, so I am looking for CSS-only solution.

I've tried setting <br>'s line-height and height with display: block, I also Googled and Stack Overflow-ed briefly, but did not find any solution. Is this even possible without changing the layout?

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Your formatting may add to the confusion to think br tags had a height value. As pointed out below, they are simply line breaks. Have you tried doing anything similar in your word processor? –  Jörg Sep 11 '09 at 8:23
2  
A-hah! Problem with Blogger? –  syockit Mar 3 '11 at 17:22

22 Answers 22

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Css:

br {
   display: block;
   margin: 10px 0;
}

The solution is probably not cross-browser compatible, but it's something at least. Also consider setting line-height:

line-height:22px;

For Google Chrome, consider setting content:

content: " ";

Other than that, I think you're stuck with a JavaScript solution.

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3  
Holy Polaris, Batman, it works!! Thanks a bunch, man! –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:46
14  
This does NOT work in : IE7, Opera10, Chrome2. In Firefox, it creates the margin double-size. You need to specify margin-top: 10px; –  awe Sep 11 '09 at 9:05
26  
Does anything work in IE7? ;) –  Brett Ryan Sep 11 '09 at 9:10
40  
+1 for not working in ie6 –  iambriansreed Apr 17 '12 at 17:23
4  
This solution works in Firefox. For webkit-based browsers you can add line-height. In the end it's something like br { display:block; margin-top:10px; line-height:22px; }. –  Cthulhu Apr 18 '12 at 15:15

Another way is to use an HR. But, and here's the cunning part, make it invisible.

Thus:

<hr style="height:30pt; visibility:hidden;" />

To make a cleaner BR break simulated using the HR: Btw works in all browsers!!

{ height:2px; visibility:hidden; margin-bottom:-1px; }
share|improve this answer
    
I had to add margin:0px for IE8 –  IvanH Jul 3 '12 at 10:02
9  
That is horrendous abuse of HTML tags, better to use a <p></p> with margins then destroy an <hr /> –  Serj Sagan May 20 '13 at 22:03
1  
Great solution for me –  Joshua Jan 21 at 18:32

As far as I know <br> does not have a height, it merely forces a line break. What you have is a text with some line breaks in addition to the auto-wrap ones, not subparagraphs. You can change the line spacing, but that will affect all lines.

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It seems that there is really no way. I've even tried playing with :before and :after properties, but... :( –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:38
    
+1 for w3 spec. –  htmldrum Apr 17 '12 at 18:09

Here is the correct solution that actually has cross-browser support:

  br {
        line-height: 150%;
     }
share|improve this answer
    
Not IE7 as far as I can tell. –  Serhiy Aug 2 '12 at 19:14
    
Works great, but you need to remove the ' ' from the height property. –  Matthew T. Baker Feb 4 '13 at 14:31
    
This works for increasing the height of a line break, but not decreasing it. –  Pluto Aug 18 at 15:59

you can apply line-height on that <p> element, so lines become larger.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, sure, but that is not what I want. –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:19
    
Well, that's the only option you have, unless you change your text markup .. –  yoda Sep 11 '09 at 8:21
    
In what way would that differ from what you want? It will increase the space between the lines. –  Jörg Sep 11 '09 at 8:23
    
I have a little more than nine blah's in my text. Imagine several kilobytes of text, divided into three blocks with three <br>'s. –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:27
    
If you apply the line-height to the <br> tag, then the forced line breaks will be bigger than the wrapped line breaks... –  peirix Sep 11 '09 at 8:28

I just had this problem, and I got around it by using

<div style="line-height:150%;">
    <br>
</div>
share|improve this answer

I haven't tried the :before/:after CSS2 pseudo-element before, mainly because it's only supported in IE8 (this concerning IE browsers). This could be the only possible CSS solution:

br:before {
    display: block;
    margin-top: 10px;
    content: "";
}

Here is an example on QuirksMode.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I had high hopes for :before { content }; too, but it failed me. –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:44
    
Inject it somewhere, it should work. Alas, it doesn't work in IE6/7. –  Filip Dupanović Sep 11 '09 at 8:48

I had a thought that you might be able to use:

br:after {
    content: ".";
    visibility: hidden;
    display: block;
}

But that didn't work on chrome or firefox.

Just thought I'd mention that in case it occurred to anyone else and I'd save them the trouble.

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<br /> will take as much space as text-filled row of your <p>, you can't change that. If you want larger, it means you want to separate into paragraph, so add other <p>. Don't forget to be the most semantic you can ;)

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Michael and yoda are both right. What you can do is use the <p> tag, which, being a block tag, uses a bottom-margin to offset the following block, so you can do something similar to this to get bigger spacing:

<p>
    A block of text.
</p>
<p>
    Another block
</p>

Another alternative is to use the block <hr> tag, with which you can explicitly define the height of the spacing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, but I've stated that I cannot change this layout right now. Of course, I will change it to something saner when it will be possible, but right now -- sorry. –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:29

What works for me is adding this inline between paragraph tags... not the best solution though.

<br style="line-height:32px">

-------- Edit ---------

I ran into issues with PC/Mac with this... It gives the text the new line-height but does not do the line-break... You may want to do some tests yourself. Sorry!

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worked for me to manage vertical size at pixel level inside a UIWebView on ios . –  Diwann Sep 27 '13 at 14:20
    
I ran into issues with PC/Mac with this... It gives the text the new line-height but does not do the line-break... You may want to do some tests yourself. Sorry! –  robinwkurtz Sep 27 '13 at 16:59

And remember that (mis)using the <hr> tag as suggested somewhere, will end the <p> tag, so forget about that solution.
If f.ex. something is styled on the surrounding <p>, that style is gone for the rest of the content after the <hr> is inserted.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  Suhosin Feb 18 at 12:49
    
Not a critique and not a request. Just trying to say what will happen if you put an hr tag inside a p tag as suggested. And as a newcomer I haven't got enough reputation to comment on the relevant post. So please advice how else I should make such comment (which IMHO is highly relevant with regards to the question). –  niels Mar 24 at 14:24

You don't seem to be able to adjust the height of a BR, but you can make it disappear reliably using display:none

Came across this page while searching for a solution to the following:

I have a situation where 3rd party payment gateway (Worldpay) only lets you customise their payment pages with 10k max of CSS and HTML (no script allowed) that get injected into the body of their template, and after a few BR's, FONT tags etc. Coupled with their DTD which forces IE7/8 into Quirks mode, this makes cross-browser customisation about as hard as it gets!

Turning off BR's makes things a lot more consistent...

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Interestingly, if the break tag is written in full-form as follows:

<br></br>

then the CSS line-height:145% works. If the break tag is written as:

<br> or 
<br/> 

then it doesn't work, at least in Chrome, IE and firefox. Weird!

share|improve this answer

Try using the CSS line-height atribute on your p tag that contains the br tag. Remember you can id your p tags if you want to isolate it, though it might be better using a div for isolation, IMO.

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you could also use the "block-quote" property in CSS. That would make it so it doesn't effect your individual lines but allows you to set parameters for just the breaks between paragraphs or "block quotes".

UPDATE:
I stand corrected. "blockquote" is actually a html property. You use it just like < p > and < /p > around your work. You could then set the parameters for your block quote in css like

blockquote { margin-top: 20px }

Hope this helps. It is similar to setting the parameters on the br and may or may not be cross browser compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the first time I ever heard of this property. Can you explain this in more detail, please? –  n1313 Sep 11 '09 at 8:33
    
I stand corrected. "blockquote" is actually a html property. You use it just like < p > and < /p > around your work. You could then set the parameters for your block quote in css like blockquote { margin-top: 20px } etc etc etc –  Jonn Sep 12 '09 at 1:50
    
i updated it for you up top. –  Jonn Sep 12 '09 at 1:52

<br> is for a line break.
<br /> is also for line break, the "/" optionally needed for void elements or for xhtml.
Using <br></br>, browsers will insert two line breaks for both are "virtually" the same.
There is no way to increase the size of a line break because it's just a line break.
Use a div with vilibility set to hidden (<div style="vilibility:hidden; line-height:150%;"</div>) or better still, a paragraph.

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i Use these methods, but i dont know if cross-browser

================= Method 1 ==================

br {
    display:none;
}

OR

================= Method 2 ==================

br {
    display: block;
    margin-bottom: 2px;
    font-size:2px;
    line-height: 2px;
}
br:before {
    display: block;
    margin-top: 2px;
    content: "";
}
br:after {
    content: ".";
    visibility: hidden;
    display: block;
}

OR

================= Method 3 ==================

br:after { content: "" }
br { content: "" }
share|improve this answer

Or you can break the rules and do this

jQuery(document).ready(function($)
{
    $('br').each(function() 
    {
        var size = $(this).attr('size');

        if ( typeof size !== 'undefined' && size !== false )
        {
            for( var i = 0 ; i < parseInt(size) ; i++ )
            {
                $(this).after('<br>');
            }
        }
    });
});

Then...

<br size="5">
share|improve this answer

This did the trick for me when I couldn't get the style spacing to work from the span tag:

        <p style='margin-bottom: 5px' >
            <span>I Agree</span>
        </p>
        <span>I Don't Agree</span>
share|improve this answer

Might found a solution very easy which you only need to create different type of
. Seem to have worked for me.

example : (html code)

<br/ class="150%space">

(css code)

br[class='150%space']
{
   line-height: 150%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
CSS naming convention should never being with a number –  John Magnolia Oct 31 at 8:38
<span style="line-height:40px;"><br></span> 

You'd have to do this inline and on each
element but it should work on most browsers Fiddle with the line height to get the desired effect. If you make it inline on each element, it should work across most browsers and e-mail(but this is too complex to discuss here).

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1  
So why post this if you're not going to give examples? The whole idea of the site is that you do discuss it. –  Paul Aug 22 at 9:51

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