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Okay I am having a little trouble loading a particular library or more that the library maybe going out of scope. Is that what is happening in this case?

MAIN PROBLEM: require libraries in a function so that they may be available in the global scope. Example:

   class Foo
      def bar
         require 'twitter_oauth'
         #....
      end
      def bar_2
         TwitterOAuth::Client.new(
            :consumer_key => 'asdasdasd',
            :consumer_secret => 'sadasdasdasdasd'
            )
      end
    end 

   temp = Foo.new
   temp.bar_2

Now to solve my problem I am trying to run eval binding it to the global scope...like this

    $Global_Binding = binding
   class Foo
      def bar
         eval "require 'twitter_oauth'", $Global_Binding
         #....
      end
      def bar_2
         TwitterOAuth::Client.new(
            :consumer_key => 'asdasdasd',
            :consumer_secret => 'sadasdasdasdasd'
            )
      end
    end 

   temp = Foo.new
   temp.bar_2

But that did not seem to do the trick...Any ideas? Is there a better way of doing this?

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1  
require is always executed at the top level, even if called deep inside an inner class/module. require parses the file and executes its code, so its content never goes out of scope. What happens in your code is that you never call bar, hence require is never executed. –  BernardK Dec 31 '12 at 3:08
1  
A class definition is "executed". If you write a puts "in class #{self.name}" statement anywhere inside the class but outside method definitions, you immediately see in class Foo displayed on the console. def (and only def) is executed as well, Ruby stores the name of the method into the table of instance methods of the class, but the content of the method is not executed at this time. The body of the method is only executed when you perform it, call it, send it as a message to an object which is an instance of the class. –  BernardK Dec 31 '12 at 3:27
    
Ah you're right indeed. What was happeneing in my code was that the libraries took soo long took to load in that by the time a certain line was reached the libraries weren't available. Thank you soo much. –  foklepoint Dec 31 '12 at 3:52
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A.
File test_top_level.rb :

puts '    (in TestTopLevel ...)'
class TestTopLevel
end

Test file ttl.rb using RSpec :

# This test ensures that an included module is always processed at the top level,
# even if the include statement is deep inside a nesting of classes/modules.

describe 'require inside nested classes/modules' do
#        =======================================

    it 'is always evaluated at the top level' do
        module Inner
            class Inner
                require 'test_top_level'
            end
        end

        if RUBY_VERSION[0..2] == '1.8'
        then
            Module.constants.should include('TestTopLevel')
        else
            Module.constants.should include(:TestTopLevel)
        end
    end
end

Execution :

$ rspec --format nested ttl.rb 

require inside nested classes/modules
    (in TestTopLevel ...)
  is always evaluated at the top level

Finished in 0.0196 seconds
1 example, 0 failures

B.
If you don't want to process unnecessary require statements, you can use autoload instead. autoload( name, file_name ) registers file_name to be loaded (using Object#require) the first time that the module name is accessed.

File twitter_oauth.rb :

module TwitterOAuth
    class Client
        def initialize
            puts "hello from #{self}"
        end
    end
end

File t.rb :

p Module.constants.sort.grep(/^T/)

class Foo
    puts "in class #{self.name}"

    autoload :TwitterOAuth, 'twitter_oauth'

    def bar_2
        puts 'in bar2'
        TwitterOAuth::Client.new
    end
end 

temp = Foo.new
puts 'about to send bar_2'
temp.bar_2

p Module.constants.sort.grep(/^T/)

Execution in Ruby 1.8.6 :

$ ruby -w t.rb 
["TOPLEVEL_BINDING", "TRUE", "Thread", "ThreadError", "ThreadGroup", "Time", "TrueClass", "TypeError"]
in class Foo
about to send bar_2
in bar2
hello from #<TwitterOAuth::Client:0x10806d700>
["TOPLEVEL_BINDING", "TRUE", "Thread", "ThreadError", "ThreadGroup", "Time", "TrueClass", "TwitterOAuth", "TypeError"]
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