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I was just playing around with a binary tree and I was curious as to why the first implementation worked but the second didn't. What am I overlooking? I think it's trivial but I'm still missing it.

1:

//just a wrapper around the insertTree method.
public void insertKey(int key){

    if(root==null) //a private 'Node' variable.
        root = new Node(key);
    else
        insertTree(key, root);
}

//recursive insert - working
private void insertTree(int key, Node node)
{
    if(key <= node.getKey())
    {
        if(node.left!=null)
            insertTree(key, node.left);
        else
            node.left = new Node(key); //explicitly setting left child
    }
    else
    {
        if(node.right!=null)
            insertTree(key, node.right);
        else
            node.right = new Node(key); //explicitly setting right child
    }

}

The variant that is not working:

2:

private void insertTree(int key, Node node)
{  //if node is null, create a new node. Can be either node.left or node.right
       if(node==null)
       {
           node = new Node(key);
           return;
       }
       else
          if(key <= node.getKey())
             insertTree(key, node.left);
          else
             insertTree(key, node.right);

}

Node is just a simple class with public left, right members and a single int key data member. Nothing fancy. So #1 works just fine and the inorder traversal produces a sorted output. Now, #2 doesn't seem to work. The root is the only one that is initialized and its left/right children continue to be null. So if I do pass node.left as a parameter, why doesn't the recursive method call assign a new node to it? What am I missing here? Java is pass by reference (i.e. value of reference) so I'm guessing this should work, but maybe I'm missing something noob-ish over here.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason it doesn't work is because the node variable in the last recursive call to insertTree does not actually refer to the same memory location as node.left in the call that preceded it. Calling a function(/method) effectively creates new storage locations for all its parameters on the stack, and copies the parameter values there.

Therefore, insertTree in your second variant simply creates a new Node and assigns it to the local variable node in that function. That assignment affects no other memory location. Then it returns, and the new Node is lost forever.

You state that "Java is pass by reference", but that's not true. Java passes references by-value.

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I knew it was something simple! Of course, the new node doesn't really get attached to the parameter. Damn. Thanks though :) –  PhD Dec 31 '12 at 3:39

You should not be using recursion to add elements to a binary tree. Recursions involve implicit stacks which are expensive. You should simply iterate to find the correct location for adding the node. Plus, when you use iterating, you don't need two methods to do the work -- one is enough. Look at the following very simple code: http://www.geekviewpoint.com/java/bst/add

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