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I have some code in jsFiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/xyuY6/

And the code:

var App= {};

App.WebPage = {
 WebPage : function(name) {
     alert("In Super");
     this.name = name;  
 },

 Home : function(name) {
      alert("In Sub");
      App.WebPage.WebPage.call(this, name);
 }


};

App.WebPage.WebPage.prototype.sayName = function() {
alert(this.name);
};

inherit(App.WebPage.WebPage, App.WebPage.Home);

var x = new App.WebPage.Home("zack");
x.sayName();

function inherit(subType, superType) {
    alert("IN HERE");
    var p = Object.create(superType);
    p.constructor = subType;
    subType.prototype = p;
}

What I'm trying to do is create a App namespace with two constructors in this namespace, WebPage and Home. WebPage is a "super type" and Home is the "sub type". Home should inherit everything from WebPage.

The problem though, as you'll see when you run the JavaScript, is the sayName function defined on the WebPage prototype is not being called when I do x.sayName. Thus, it's not being inherited.

Why?

Thanks for the help!!!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It seems like you got the superclass and subclass mixed up at some point (either in the call or in inherit's definition)...

Here's the fixed code (if I understand what you are trying to do): http://jsfiddle.net/45uLT/

var App= {};

App.WebPage = {
     WebPage : function(name) {
         alert("In Super");
         this.name = name;  
     },

     Home : function(name) {
          alert("In Sub");
          App.WebPage.WebPage.call(this, name);
     }


};


App.WebPage.WebPage.prototype.sayName = function() {
    alert(this.name);
};

inherit(App.WebPage.WebPage, App.WebPage.Home);

var x = new App.WebPage.Home("zack");
x.sayName();

function inherit(superType, subType) {
    alert("IN HERE");
    var p = new superType;
    subType.prototype = p;
    subType.prototype.constructor = subType;
}

Hope this is what you wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I was looking for. Thank you! –  user1513171 Dec 31 '12 at 3:37
    
I updated the jsFiddle. Trying to override the sayName method. Could you tell me why this isn't working? jsfiddle.net/45uLT/1 –  user1513171 Dec 31 '12 at 3:39
    
Never mind, just needed to change up the order of some calls. –  user1513171 Dec 31 '12 at 3:40
    
Yup, you need to redefine the method after you inherit! :-) Glad I could help! –  mbinette Dec 31 '12 at 3:42

Here's a working example in jsfiddle based on what you're trying to do above:

http://jsfiddle.net/8GwRd/

var App = (function() {
    function WebPage(name) {
        this.type = 'WebPage';
        this.name = name;
    }

    WebPage.prototype.sayName = function() {
      alert(this.name + ' is a ' + this.type);
    };

    function Home(name) {
        WebPage.call(this, name);
        this.type = 'Home'
    }

    Home.prototype = new WebPage();

    return {
        WebPage: WebPage,
        Home: Home
    };       

})();

var y = new App.WebPage('bob');
y.sayName();

var x = new App.Home("zack");
x.sayName();
share|improve this answer
    
This approach is pretty different than mine. Is there a reason this approach is possibly better? –  user1513171 Dec 31 '12 at 3:47
    
Thanks, I do like this solution. –  user1513171 Dec 31 '12 at 13:48

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