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Consider the intention behind the following illegal C++11 code:

struct Base
{
    template<typename U>
    virtual U convert() = 0;
};

template<typename T>
struct Derived : Base
{
    T t;

    template<typename U>
    virtual U convert() { return U(t); }
};

struct Any
{
    Base* b;

    template<typename U>
    operator U() { return b->convert<U>(); }
};

int main()
{
    Any a = ...;
    string s = a; // s = a->b->t if T is convertible to string
                  //    fails otherwise with compile error or runtime exception
                  //                            (either acceptable)
}

Is there a way to achieve the same or similiar effect with legal code?

(fyi the above way is illegal because templates may not be ‘virtual’)

Update:

struct Base
{
    void* p;
    type_info type;
};

template<typename T>
struct Derived : Base
{
    Derived()
    {
         p = &t; // immovable
         type = typeid(T);
    }

    T t;
};

struct Any
{
    Base* b;

    template<typename T = U, typename U>
    operator U()
    {
        if (b->type != typeid(T))
           throw exception();

        T* t = (T*) b->p;

        return U(*t);
    }
};
share|improve this question
    
Just for those of us who find the concept interesting but don't know C++03/C++11 nearly well enough, could you post the compiler error? –  Platinum Azure Dec 31 '12 at 5:06
    
First of all, a function template cannot be virtual (in C++03 and C++11 both). Now, if it cannot be virtual then how can you propagate U from Any conversion function to the Base's convert function which seems to be virtual in any case. –  Nawaz Dec 31 '12 at 5:16
    
@PlatinumAzure: The illegal part is that templates may not be ‘virtual’ –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 31 '12 at 5:30
1  
No, there isn't, because at no point you have the type of both source and target... Unless you specify those conversions explicitly –  K-ballo Dec 31 '12 at 5:54
1  
Your update is more or less the same as boost::any. You have to know the stored type to fetch the value, which was not the case in the original question. Then you just cast it to whatever type you want. –  n.m. Dec 31 '12 at 10:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Is this what you want?

struct Base
{
  virtual void* convert(const std::type_info&) = 0;
};

template<typename T>
struct Derived : Base
{
  virtual void* convert(const std::type_info& ti)
  { return typeid(T) == ti ? &t : nullptr; }

  T t;
};

struct Any
{
  Base* b;

  template<typename U>
    operator U()
    {
      if (auto p = b->convert(typeid(U)))
        return *static_cast<U*>(p);
      throw std::exception();
    }
};

As the other answer says, it's hard to know exactly what you want as you've only shown invalid code, not explained what you're trying to achieve.

Edit oh I see now you want it to work for any convertible type, not just exact matches ... then no, you can't turn a type_info back into the type it represents, which would be needed for the derived type to test if the given type_info corresponded to a type that its stored type is convertible to. You need to know the correct type and specify it somehow, either explicitly or implicitly via deduction. If you then want to convert it to another type, you can do that separately:

Any a{ new Derived<int>() };
try {
  char c = a;  // throws
}
catch (...)
{
}
int i = a;        // OK
char c = (int)a;  // OK
share|improve this answer


Based on your update I think that this is what you are trying to do.

#include <typeinfo>
#include <exception>
#include <string>

template <typename T>
struct Any{
        T* t;
        Any():t(NULL){}
        Any(const T& _t){
                t=new T(_t);
        }
        template<typename U>
        operator U(){
                if(typeid(T)!=typeid(U) || t==NULL)
                        throw std::exception();
                return *t;
        }
};

int main (){
        Any<std::string> a(std::string("Nothing"));
        std::string b=a;
        return 0;
};

If this doesn't help please explain in text not code what you are trying to achieve. It'll be useful to tell us also why you want to use those two extra classes Base and Derived.

share|improve this answer
    
See boost::any: boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/boost/any.hpp. Base is equivilent to placeholder and Derived is equivilent to holder. –  Andrew Tomazos Dec 31 '12 at 10:37

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