Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do I go about making a socket policy file server in C#. All it has to do is listen on port 843 for the string "<policy-file-request/>" followed by a NULL byte and then return an XML string (which is the socket policy file).

I haven't coded this sort of thing before and am unsure of where to start. Do I create it in a windows service? Any tips or links are welcome.

Background:

To contact a web service from flash I am using the 'as3httpclient' library instead of the URLRequest/URLLoader. This is because it gives me the ability to send custom headers with GET requests. This library uses low-level sockets to do its stuff.

When flash uses low-level sockets to connect to a server it looks for a socket policy file - and this needs to be served up by a socket policy file server.

Socket Policy File Article from Adobe

share|improve this question
1  
Digging out my implementation... –  spender Sep 11 '09 at 8:50
    
As for listening for "", I think it would be better to check for an Xml containing the single node <policy-file-request/> as this is what the spec actually says. –  spender Sep 11 '09 at 9:40
    
Oops. Looks like that's what you actually said, but it got gobbled. Have amended your post. –  spender Sep 11 '09 at 11:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A few things to be aware of using your suggested architecture:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/285290/trying-to-send-an-http-request-over-sockets

Principally, you need to be aware that even though you can chat http at a lower level using sockets, there are a large number of cases where communication in this fashion will fail. Mainly these failures will occur if the user has a proxy server enabled in their browser, as there is no effective means of discovering and subsequently using the proxy when connecting via a socket.

In order to make a policy server, you can use the TcpListener class. You would start listening as follows:

var tcpListener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 843 );
tcpListener.start();
tcpListener.BeginAcceptTcpClient(new AsyncCallback(NewClientHandler), null);

The method NewClientHandler would have the form:

    private void NewClientHandler(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        TcpClient tcpClient = tcpListener.EndAcceptTcpClient(ar);
        ...

At which point you might want to supply the tcpClient object to a class of your own creation to handle the validation of the data coming from the socket. I'm going to call it RemoteClient.

In RemoteClient, you'd have something like this:

    var buffer=new byte[BUFFER_SIZE];
    tcpClient.GetStream().BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, Receive, null);

and a Receive method:

    private void Receive(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        int bytesRead;
        try
        {
            bytesRead = tcpClient.GetStream().EndRead(ar);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {

            //something bad happened. Cleanup required
            return;
        }

        if (bytesRead != 0)
        {
            char[] charBuffer = utf8Encoding.GetChars(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
            try
            {
                tcpClient.GetStream().BeginRead(buffer, 0, buffer.Length, Receive, null);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                //something bad happened. Cleanup required
            }
        }
        else
        {
            //socket closed, I think?
            return;
        }
    }

and some send methods:

    public void Send(XmlDocument doc)
    {
        Send(doc.OuterXml);
    }
    private void Send(String str)
    {

        Byte[] sendBuf = utf8Encoding.GetBytes(str);
        Send(sendBuf);
    }
    private void Send(Byte[] sendBuf)
    {
        try
        {
            tcpClient.GetStream().Write(sendBuf, 0, sendBuf.Length);
            tcpClient.GetStream().WriteByte(0);
            tcpClient.GetStream().WriteByte(13); //very important to terminate XmlSocket data in this way, otherwise Flash can't read it.

        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            //something bad happened. cleanup?
            return;
        }
    }

That's all the important details I think. I wrote this some time ago... the Receive method looks like it could do with a rework, but it should be enough to get you started.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great - thanks for the headsup on the proxy problem as well. –  dan Sep 11 '09 at 12:35
    
Just to be clear - the link to the SO question is about appending an extra /r/n. That hasn't got anything to do with the proxy problem you mention in the next paragraph does it ? It's two different issues to be aware of? –  dan Sep 11 '09 at 12:41
    
Correct. Proxy issue is different. –  spender Sep 11 '09 at 20:44
    
The proxy issue is a killer for us - I'm going to change the web services to POST and use the standard URLRequest/URL Loader - I believe we can add headers that way. –  dan Sep 12 '09 at 1:01
1  
That's right. You can add headers to a POST, but not to a GET due to host browser limitations (although this is very poorly documented). I think I got to around the same point as you have reached when I realised the futility of socket based HTTP. –  spender Sep 12 '09 at 9:15

Create a listening socket.

When a connection is opened, perform a receive and wait for the expected string. When received send the file content and then close the socket.

Wrap this in a service (running as a low privilege account).

Most of the work is done with the System.Net.Sockets.Socket class, the documentation contains a sample, The API is very similar to the BSD socket API overall (largely there is a 1:1 mapping from BSD API to Socket (or help type) method) so any background should be easily translatable.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for running in a service as a low privileged account advice. Thanks. –  dan Sep 11 '09 at 12:38

I had to to this task with both Java and C#, they are quite similar.

You can have a look at java policy file.

Some issue can see at this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/12854204/1343667

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.